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Old Sep 20, 2007, 7:55 PM   #1
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I returned for more photos tonight and came away more puzzled. I appears to be a husband and wife buried here, I can not read the writing on the small headstones. The writing on the main stone seems to point to the wife being the seafarer.

Bob

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Old Sep 20, 2007, 7:55 PM   #2
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 7:56 PM   #3
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 8:26 PM   #4
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Okay Bob, we have the date of birth and death, and the cemetery. I wonder when it says Arrived at HER haven if it refers to a woman or a ship. In your first pic here there are two markers on the ground. In your previous post I believe the one marker said John. Although you might not be able to read it outright if you take a pic of the markers you might be able to bring out the writing with photoshop. This is all kinda interesting. Thanks.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 8:39 PM   #5
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Definitely not your run-of-the-mill headstones.

Unless the husband and wife were both born on the same day, and both died on the same day, I doubt that 'HER' would have referred tothe 'ship' that was their life together.

But that would be extraordinary.

Unless the dates refer to their wedding day and the date of the first one's passing.

Which would also be extraordinary.

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Old Sep 20, 2007, 8:46 PM   #6
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But if you see this monument as the captains. His ship left port (date of birth) then found her haven (date of death). Ships are always referred to in feminine terms.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 8:58 PM   #7
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Bynx wrote:
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Ships are always referred to in feminine terms.
Not always.

While serving in the US Navy, I was assigned to the USS Vulcan, AR-5, a repair ship, which was christened on Dec 14, 1940.Walt Disney happened to be an honored guest during the ceremony, during which he presented a drawing of the character 'Doc', one of the seven dwarfs. From then on, the USS Vulcan was referred to, not as 'Her', butas 'Doc'.

Yes, that's me, a 'sewer of information'.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 9:39 PM   #8
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In this day and age there is no respect for tradition. The same could not be said for the 1800's. Correct me if Im wrong, but the general concensus for ships back then they were given a feminine gender. Ive never seen anywhere where a ship was referred to as a He. This isnt something to argue over. Im just curious about this marker and it seems the guy was important and rich enough to have quite a big one. Id like to know something about him. By the way Doc doesnt designate any gender. I think there are a few women doctors who would argue about that if you said otherwise.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 10:15 PM   #9
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Bynx wrote:
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...the general concensus for ships back then they were given a feminine gender. Ive never seen anywhere where a ship was referred to as a He.
Yes! Absolutely! And even today!

I was just pointing out a single, perhaps historic instance in which tradition was set aside. (I beleive there is alsoan aircraft carrier that is referred toin themasculine gender, but I don't remember the details.)

Similarly, tradition dictates that vessels that are typically carried aboard other, larger vessels, are referred to as 'boats', while vessels that are not typically carried aboard other vessels are referred to as 'ships'. And even though the USS Cole (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Cole_bombing ) was once carried aboard another vessel, she continues to be referred to as a 'ship' along with other vessels of her class. On the other hand, submarines haven't been carried aboard other vessels in quite some time, and so should be referred to as 'ships'. But submarines continue to be referred to as 'boats' in reverence to their predecessors, thereby instituting a new tradition.

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By the way Doc doesnt designate any gender. I think there are a few women doctors who would argue about that if you said otherwise.
Yes! Absolutely.

But in this instance, 'Doc' refers to the Disney character.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 10:38 PM   #10
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A strange one indeed. The person interred there is Miriam Huff. Very odd monument from where Im sitting. This is a challenge and fun.
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