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Old Oct 31, 2004, 4:23 PM   #1
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Hi folks;

Just playing around here. I had some shots taken with my wide-angle lens to exaggerate the perspective. I know they are all "tippy", but that is the effect I was trying for. I just don't know if thethree shotswork together in one presentation.

The church is in Maidstone Ontario, just outside Windsor. Apart from the church, the main architecture in the community is a grain silo.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Regards,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
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Old Nov 3, 2004, 9:57 PM   #2
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It's me again. :-)

Not that I'm trying to revive a dead thread, but I have some more shots in the same series, sort of... maybe this should be under digital art.

This is Assumption Church in Windsor. A beautiful 19th century building on the University of Windsor campus.I used some extreme unsharp mask settings until the colours and contrast became surreal.

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
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Old Nov 3, 2004, 10:38 PM   #3
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nice shots tom

the second series is a bit too modified for my taste...but not a bad job

nice angles in the first series..i also like the placement of them IN a series!

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Old Nov 3, 2004, 10:50 PM   #4
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Hi Vito;

Thanks for the comments. I tend to agree about the digital modification... but the structures were so large and impressive that (and the lighting so flat) that the colours seemed mundane... and as I'd already done a series in B/W... Anyway, I was trying for an art/poster kind of look. I'll have to work the bugs out of that.

It's one of those old dillemmas: you plan a shoot, and when you get there, the conditions are bad. Do you just pack the camera away or try to salvage some shots?

Regards,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
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Old Nov 3, 2004, 11:34 PM   #5
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well, i've seen different opinions in my travels of internet photography surfing...lol

i personally would try to salvage, so it's not a complete waste of a trip, but there are most definetely people that will pack up and go if the light isn't good (well, if it's just bad temporarily (cloud or something) they'll stay...)

i dunno..it depends...

for me, i'm still learning to perfect my technique...so a bad lighting may pose a nice challenge, to get a sharp well exposed shot in a tough spot...

but for professionals, that don't need practice...and have for the most part perfected their technique, they can turn around and come back another day (not so easy with a full time job though...)

btw...thought i'd share this site with you...it's an online magazine

www.naturephotographers.net

read some of the articles....i've particularly enjoyed Darwin Wiggets articles...

hope this helps

Vito
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Old Nov 4, 2004, 6:26 AM   #6
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photosbyvito wrote:
Quote:
well, i've seen different opinions in my travels of internet photography surfing...lol

i personally would try to salvage, so it's not a complete waste of a trip, but there are most definetely people that will pack up and go if the light isn't good (well, if it's just bad temporarily (cloud or something) they'll stay...)

for me, i'm still learning to perfect my technique...so a bad lighting may pose a nice challenge, to get a sharp well exposed shot in a tough spot...

but for professionals, that don't need practice...and have for the most part perfected their technique, they can turn around and come back another day (not so easy with a full time job though...)

Agreed, agreed and agreed. The particular day in question I did get quite a few shots off thinking "I'll have to replace that sky" or something like that. I also got a couple of shots of pedestrians and a skateboarder (they love getting their pictures taken, but by that time even the bad light was fading.)

You are quite right when you speak of the needs and practices of amateurs. Less-than-perfect conditions are challenges we can use to master some of the minutae of photography technique.

Thanks for the link. I enjoy reading your posts, Vito. Keep 'em coming.

Regards,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
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