Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Biweekly Shoot Out

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 26, 2006, 8:15 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
nhmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern New Hampshire
Posts: 5,202
Default

Another one of my hometown. This is the one currently existing church building in town.

I am learning a lot about my town I've lived in for nearly 19 years from this challenge. This is one of many churches that have existed in town over the years. Most of the others have succumbed to various fires. I also discovered that each of these church buildings was actually home to various religions at different times. Usually all within the same year. Each congregation would have "responsibility" for the church for a number of months of the year when they could hold services in it and took care of the property.

I don't know if we are supposed to fix the photos we take for this challenge, but this one was especially difficult for my limited experience. It was taken late in the day, with a stark white building and a very dark sky from the driveway at the bottom of the hill. My camera settings on manual were f4.5/ 1/2500 sec at ISO 200. I tried different settings, but this one came out the best. I did adjust the levels in PSE and cropped the photo and used the "remove color cast" option to make the building the white it is. I will try to retake this photo with different settings if someone can tell me what I was doing wrong.

I find I do not like photos taken on the auto settings with this camera (Pentax K100D). I've either got the basic settings for the auto set wrong or something. So, mostly shoot in manual now.

Any advice gladly accepted.

p.s. I wanted so badly to unfurl the twisted flag, but was afraid the neighbors were watching me.
Attached Images
 
nhmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 27, 2006, 12:20 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
toshi43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Vernon BC Canada
Posts: 1,618
Default

I don't think anyone minds if you 'fix' your photos - I do it all the time. How did you have your camera's metering system set when you took this picture? Because the front of the white church looks blown out, I suspect it may have been set to 'average' or 'multi-zone', although Pentax may describe these settings in different terms. I'm not at all familiar with your camera, but trying some of it's other metering options might help. Good luck.:-)
toshi43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2006, 3:22 AM   #3
Moderator
 
selvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 7,204
Default

NH Mom,

As Toshi noted the blown highlights on the front of the church are perhaps due to overexposure. I slight reduction in f-stop might fix that next time. Another solution would be to use the bracketing feature of your Pentax to take three shots. One shot is slightly underexposed, the middle one is taken using the camera's best guess and the third slightly overexposed.

Of course there is always the editing solution. See the edit below. I heightened the contrast a tad, slighly darkened the photo, and finally I darkened the highlights. The last step seems to have brought out the pattern on the front of the church a bit more and reduced the blown highlights. The result is not a dramatic increase but should be clearly visible.

Aloha


selvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2006, 6:47 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
nhmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern New Hampshire
Posts: 5,202
Default

Thanks. I just checked and it was set to center-weighted-average. I thought I had it on spot metering. But, must have changed it somewhere along the way. I will try again this weekend with it set differently. Too late to go out this morning before work and will be dark by the time I get home. I could go see if this church is lighted at night. That could make a nice photo. If I set the settings right :-)

I had taken another one on auto and it processed at f14, 1/500 sec, ISO 200. But, the image is much, much darker. I didn't even try to adjust it, but might have been more successful with it from your comments.
nhmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2006, 11:46 AM   #5
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

I like this photo. I always like photos of old churches. They have a unique architecture that is not found in other buildings.

Tip--Something most people don't realize is that a photo that is dark coming out of the camera can be easily fixed on the computer since all the necessary color and contrast informatin is present. However, very little can be done with blown highlights since all detail in the blown areas is lost. Consequently, it is better to err on the underexposed side rather than overexposed. Grossly underexposed photos, on the other hand are difficult to correct since colors tend to shift.

Another thing that has been mentioned in this forum many times but I will repeat it again. Your metering system, in automatic mode, can and will lie to you in very bright scenes such as white buildings or snow and in very dark scenes such as night shots. The industry exposure standard is 18% gray. In auto, your metering system will adjust the exposure to give an overall 18% gray average. What this means is that in a very bright scene, it will reduce the exposure to darken the shot. The problem is that to render a snow scene at 18% gray will make the image unacceptably dark. The opposite is true of night or dark shots. To overcome this problem it is necessary to use exposure compensation. For a bright scene, you probably want +1.0 ev compensation as a start. This allows you to use auto-exposure but compensates for the 18% gray factor. For night scenes, you would use -1.0 ev as a start.

If you are using manual exposure, you still get a meter indication in the viewfinder. In this case, for a very bright scene, you need to reduce the aperture by one f-stop or double the shutter speed. Reverse these adjustments for dark scenes.

Note--These compensating adjustments are required regardless of which metering mode you are using, spot, center-weight, or matrix. The 18% gray factor applies in all three modes.

Hope this helps.

Cal

calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2006, 9:20 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
nhmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern New Hampshire
Posts: 5,202
Default

Thanks for the info Cal. I will have to digest it when I'm a little more alert.

Here is the darker shot with adjustments. I can't tell if it looks any better or not than the first one I posted.

I do always find myself adjusting the EV at +.3 or even +.7 at times when in manual mode. They just don't come out looking right at 0 no matter what I have the settings at. And, actually, I think I have the default to always be +.3 from the start. Unless that doesn't affect in manual mode. I'm still learning the camera.

I will be trying to leave a little early in the morning to get a shot of the church just down the road from me on my way to work. It's not in the town I live in, but is only about 3 miles from my house. Hope that's close enough. I work in government, so sounds close enough for me.:-)

It is more like the traditional New England church building with the spires and all.
Attached Images
 
nhmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 30, 2006, 4:58 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,885
Default

Beautiful church and wonderful informative lessons shared here. thank you.
vsch1 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:36 AM.