Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Biweekly Shoot Out

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 29, 2007, 6:13 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Trojansoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Hot Springs, AR
Posts: 3,723
Default

Shot from inside heavy woods
Attached Images
 
Trojansoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 29, 2007, 7:15 PM   #2
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

This is a good use of natural framing. However the duck or goose (not sure which) is slightly out of focus. I think I would have waited a couple of seconds to get the "fowl" centered in the natural frame and make sure the camera is focusing on the bird and not something else. I realize that you probably didn't have much time to verify settings. In this case, it might be good to use spot focus if available to insure the camera is focusing on the bird.

Cal

calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29, 2007, 7:35 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Trojansoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Hot Springs, AR
Posts: 3,723
Default

Cal, I'm not sure if it's a duck or a goose either, but from size, I'd say duck. I know the sucker could really swim. I was moving parallel to him in the woods, looking for the first opening, and just shot before he popped out of the frame, or changed directions (as he had already done four or five times, lol). I was using spot focus but the out of focus blur could well be from camera movement since I didn't have time to get my monopod set well before firing.

My wife and I went on about a two hour trek through a nature preserve this afternoon. With the challenge in mind, I found myself looking for natural frames. However, when I got back and went through the shots, I generally found that either the framing element or the center element was out of focus.
Trojansoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29, 2007, 8:17 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Trojansoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Hot Springs, AR
Posts: 3,723
Default

BTW Cal, I got help on the Wildlife Forum on identification. It's an American coot.
Trojansoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29, 2007, 8:49 PM   #5
Moderator
 
selvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 7,204
Default

Trojansoc,

Framing and focus are really tough with the auto focus of digital cameras when tree branches are involved and especially when they are close to you.

Most digital camera autofocus systems given a scene, gravitate towards trying to focus on the closest object near the center of the scene. Unfortunately this means that as you use the natural formation of branches to frame your shot you are also helping the autofocus system to lock in on the nearby branches rather than the object(s) in the exact middle of your viewfinder.

One way to minimize this is to use spot metering if your camera has this option. This tends to force the camera to pay more attention to what's in the center of the lens rather than the nearby branches. DSLR cameras are less prone to some of these problems since they generally have more focussing options and their focus algorithms are more sophisticated.

The coot in your shot wasn't helping either by moving around. Living things have a nasty habit of doing that (kids are a great example) and even non-living ones seem to sway in the wind at exactly the same time you press the shutter release. I have thousands of photos to prove that.

Aloha and thanks for sharing.


selvin is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:07 PM.