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Old Jun 3, 2007, 11:13 AM   #1
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This is the oldest Scottish castle still largely intact, afterabout 2000 years, and must beabout the coldest and loneliest. It's off 'Mainland' Shetland.
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Old Jun 3, 2007, 11:18 AM   #2
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This is the hole where the roof should be. I was standing in the stone hearth. If you copy the image and resize it you can have fun with Moire effects because of the wire grill to keep out the vast (but rapidly falling) numbers of seabirds.

Details at http://www.shetland-heritage.co.uk/b...ousa_broch.htm

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Old Jun 8, 2007, 8:31 PM   #3
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Alan,

I would imagine that during its use the ocean was a bit further away. Otherwise it must have been an uncomfortable castle with the ocean that closeby.

Thanks for sharing these shots of such "old" buildings.

Aloha
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Old Jun 9, 2007, 9:41 AM   #4
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ya gotta see one to understand how impressive they are

they are infact fortifications for villages to seek safety in, they where built all over scotland and the isles 2000 years ago.

there are 2 near glen elg one almost as tall as the shetland on, which is near the kyle of lock alshe, we visited them last summer and to see the workmanship from 2000 years ago was amazing, they are twin walled with a staircase between them, and as we know round is stronger than square, in those days no way could u get in

Gary
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Old Jun 9, 2007, 11:15 AM   #5
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selvin wrote:
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during its use the ocean was a bit further away.
I think this one was probably always by the seaside, being a mere 2000 years old.

In contrast, the Orkney ancient house in my other archaeological post was a farm on a hill, being quite early neolithic. The big sea level changes were in progress with retreating ice sheets. The slightly younger Skara Brae site on Mainland Orkney obviously wasn't far from the sea, because it was deeply buried in its own used seashell dump, with lots of sand on top.But it wasn't too close either, because it wasn't uncovered, (largely intact),until a great storm in 1850.

In Scotland, especially in the islands, indeed much of the British Isles, threats havemostoften come from the sea, the only practical transport route. So there are thousands of seaside fortifications. I expect that's so in Hawaii as well. I expect they're there, under several thousand feet of volcanic debris!

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Old Jun 9, 2007, 11:25 AM   #6
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Reanimator wrote:
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they are twin walled with a staircase between them
Yes. At Mousa you can go right to the top. The big Glenelg broch is the highest Scottish mainland one. Nearly 30 years ago I remember scrambling up the remains of the staircase in Dun Carloway, NW Isle of Lewis, but now you can only peer a little way up it.
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