Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Biweekly Shoot Out

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 16, 2007, 8:42 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default

This is our front garden retaining wall. It's in need of attention, but I think it'll wait another year or two.
Attached Images
 
Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 16, 2007, 12:56 PM   #2
Moderator
 
selvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 7,204
Default

Alan,

"Graceful" yes but dilapidated? I don't know tough call.

Aloha
selvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2007, 1:41 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default

selvin wrote:
Quote:
..but dilapidated? I don't know...
Well one or two blocks have on occasion fallen off, but not these ones....yet!
Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2007, 7:04 PM   #4
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

I have to agree with Selvin. It doesn't look dilapidated to me. It looks like a nice garden wall that just need a little bit of work.

Cal

calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2007, 9:19 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default

calr wrote:
Quote:
I have to agree with Selvin. It doesn't look dilapidated to me. It looks like a nice garden wall that just need a little bit of work.
selvin wrote:
Quote:
Dilapidation is a term meaning in general a falling into decay. ....
For this challenge any item in a dilapidated condition will suffice. It does not have to be a building
Oh dear, here we go again. Every definition of 'dilapidation' and 'dilapidated' I can find incorporates phrases similar to "(falling into)..state of disrepair or decay".

'Graceful' definitions are all variations on "characterized by elegance or beauty of form, manner, movement, or speech; elegant" (dictionary.com).

If garden walls gradually falling down and fallen leaves, (both still looking good photographically as they do so) don't fall into those definitions, I don't know how to tell what what does! I and everyone seem to me to have have attempted to include both elements of the title in their entries.

If you two & others have clearer ideas, please may I hear them?

The Latin derivation arises from 'scattering of stones', which is what happens accidentally or deliberately to neglected buildings. Historically and archaeologically it includeswhat you do to your opponents' castles, called 'slighting' in Cromwellian 17th century Britain. Thisoften results in 'robbing out' where the stones are used later for something else. Nature(of which human action or inaction is, of course, a part), does exactly the same, biologically and geologically, on a grander scale of recycling and on a prodigious range of timescales.

If a street sign needing a lick of paint on one side of the road is dilapidated, and a wall a few feet away that needs moderately urgent rebuilding to stop it falling over isn't, I must remain, as often, bemused.

Yours pedantically, Alan T


Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2007, 10:14 PM   #6
Moderator
 
selvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 7,204
Default

Alan,

Hope the bee in your bonnet has calmed down. Just joking.

I'm hinging this on the "decay and disrepair" part of the definition. Your stone wall as shown in the picture hardly appears to be either in disrepair or decay. Cosmetic upgrading maybe. As I just pointed out to someone the term growing old gracefully is perhaps more appropriate.

Regarding the signs, they are in a state of decay and should be repaired before they get worse and people can't read them. Thus my rationale for dilapidation.

As to my previous rulings on seasonal changes I have to recant, even my own submission since I madean egregious fault (mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa) and should have indicated originally thatseasonal changes are not included. You have my apologies.

You've got some fascinating etymology there. What was your source? The main source I used for dilapidation refers to dis+lapidation. To pelt with stones. (Encyclopedia Britannica). There is no mention of the disassembling of castles/buildings.

Not being present at your home and near your stone wall it is indeed difficult for us to say whether or not decay is present.

Aloha
selvin is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:42 PM.