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Old Dec 11, 2007, 11:33 PM   #1
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A piece of cotton flannel meets an off camera flash.


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Old Dec 12, 2007, 11:06 AM   #2
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This is an interesting concept but I think it needs more work. The flash is too bright. If the flash was connected to the camera with a cable, try dialing in some negative flash compensation, say about -2.0. This reduces the power of the flash by two f-stops or EV's. If the flash was not connected, see if there is a way, manually, to reduce the flash power with the controls on the flash.

Wit the intensity of the flash reduced, the silhouette of the fabric would be sharper.

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Old Dec 12, 2007, 11:32 AM   #3
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Sorry Mr Spock but if I shot that no one would see it as I would have deleted in toot sweet.
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Old Dec 13, 2007, 9:58 PM   #4
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Kudos to you for trying something different! Cal is right...dial down that flash. You can come up with some pretty neat images using this technique!

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Old Dec 15, 2007, 2:46 PM   #5
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Thanks everyone.

I am not sure I can dial down the Vivitar 2800 flash. It doesn't have any controls other than the red and blue slider in the front and the on/off switch in the back. Maybe I can put a piece of paper between the fabric and the flash head to difuse the light a bit. Back to the wife's sweat shop in the basement...

Here's how I set up the shot originally:


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Old Dec 15, 2007, 3:50 PM   #6
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It looks like you have the flash mounted on a slave trigger. In other words, it looks like it is triggered by an on camera flash. I have used slaves but I don't think any kind of control information can be passed from the camera. Now, if you use a cable designed for your camera to connect the remote flash, then you should be able to use on-camera controls to dial down the flash. I didn't notice but is the flash the same brand as the camera? If so, then a cable should work. If they are not the same brand, you won't be able to control flash power remotely.

If this all sounds confusing, I apologize. Basically, if the flash is not 100% compatible with the camera you can't use all the flash functions with or without a cable. Now, I am speaking with personal knowledge of the Nikon system. I am assuming your brand of camera has similar restrictions.

Another thing to consider in this type of shot is possible damage to the camera sensor. You are exposing the sensor to an extremely bright light. Albeit, it is not as bright as shooting the sun but there is the possibility of overloading those electronic pixels. This is a remote possibility but why take chances. That sensor is probably about half the cost of the camera body.

There! Now I think I have illustrated the principal "If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, then try to baffle them with BS"!

Cal

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Old Dec 16, 2007, 7:19 AM   #7
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Instead of pointing the flash at the subject, how about turning it around and bouncing the flash off a piece of white paper?
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Old Dec 16, 2007, 8:28 AM   #8
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Or try setting up your computer to generate an all white screen and hang the fabric in front of the monitor. Don't use a flash. Set your shutter speed for 1/30th in order to synchronize with the monitor scan rate.

You could also get some interesting patterns and effects by setting up a colored screen.

Cal

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