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Old Mar 30, 2008, 6:18 PM   #1
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This was a hotel and resturant supply store. Today it's an architects office. I decided to try and get a similar feel by converting to b&w. You can see the reflections of the buildings across the street and of the photographer and his tripod. I tried to duplicate it exactly but there was a SUV parked in the street that the original photographer didn't have to contend with. Where he was able to back into the street and shoot, I had to shoot three panels, stitch and remove distortion. Wouldn't that earlier photographer be amazed at what we can do now without ever entering a darkroom?
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Old Mar 30, 2008, 6:19 PM   #2
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Here's mine, taken this afternoon.
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Old Mar 30, 2008, 6:32 PM   #3
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Awesome, another very well preserved relic. After careful examination it looks like everything is still original just a different color. Great work Bill!

Bob
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Old Mar 30, 2008, 6:44 PM   #4
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Thanks Bob. I've noticed that the early photographers were able to get wide shots with little distortion. Does anybody know how they did it? Is it because the negatives were so much larger?
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Old Mar 30, 2008, 7:54 PM   #5
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The B&W conversion works very nicely. You make an excellent point about the opportunities our technologies give us. I couldn't help but smile about the comments you made about problems with the SUV. My wife was about to divorce me this weekend for standing in the middle of traffic, dodging cars,shooting downtown.

Paul
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Old Mar 30, 2008, 8:03 PM   #6
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Thanks Paul,
My wife usually goes with me on my photography excursions. She's a great assistant and like yours she watches the traffic while I run out into the street to get a shot. I've really latched onto this challenge because I'm a history buff and have a lot of old photos of Louisville and the surrounding area. One of the most striking things I've noticed when trying to re-create historic photos is that not only the subject has changed but the spot where the photographer stood almost never is accessible today. The other big gotcha is trees. Several of my favorite historical scenes are today completely obscured by foliage. I had a great one planned today and realized it could only be gotten in the winter when all of the leaves have fallen.
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Old Mar 31, 2008, 3:11 AM   #7
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bill.guenthner wrote:
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.....I had to shoot three panels, stitch and remove distortion. Wouldn't that earlier photographer be amazed at what we can do now without ever entering a darkroom?....
A fine piece of work in the face of extreme difficulty!

Hope you don't mind my asking, but in your other excellent shot, (the spaghetti factory), did you do a vertical stitch to assist with the necessary extreme perspective correction, or was just a straightforward software fix? Whatever it was, it's undetectable to my eye and all huge verticals are perfect there.

(Or do you have a digital camera with a rising front?!)

I ask because in a shot for this 'challenge' I tried quite mild correction of converging verticals, and due to insufficent pixels, perhaps, it was too obvious after resizing and sharpening. So I gave up and used another shot instead.


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Old Mar 31, 2008, 5:06 AM   #8
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Thanks Alan,
For the Spaghetti Factory shot, I shot at 18mm leaving enough image on all sides to allow for some cropping. Then I opened it in Photoshop Elements 6 and used Transform Image -> Distort and moved the bottom corners closer together and the top corners farther apart. Then using the same distort tool I stretched it vertically just a little to restore a proper height. This gives you a trapezoid shaped image which you'll then need to crop back to a rectangle.
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Old Mar 31, 2008, 5:03 PM   #9
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Almost perfect stitch although I can see some mismatches in the center of the image...some lines that don't connect and a perspective change.

I don't know if you have done much shooting for stitching. To have it come out really well, you need to plan the shot. (if you have the time). The best way is to mount the camera on a tripod and make sure it is level. Set everything in manual (focus and exposure). Adjust focus for about the average distance in the shot. Expose for the portion of the scene that is mid way between the lightest and darkest. Then without changing any settings, shoot the required number of shots, overlapping each by about 20-30%. Don't do any post processing before stitching. If you post process the individual shots, they may not match up well in the stitching process. For the actual stitching, you can do it manually (more difficult) or use the stitching routines in PS. Once you have stitched the image to your liking, you can post-process to your hearts content!

Bill, you probably knew all this but I am sure there are others here who have never done any stitching. This is a two-bit lesson for anyone interested.

Cal

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Old Mar 31, 2008, 6:38 PM   #10
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I hear you Cal. This is a blockfromthe Louisville Slugger Museum. It's not a tripod friendly area. The people walking up and downthe sidewalk will wait a second or two if they see you shooting but that's about it. If I was shooting for keeps I'd go back on sunny Sunday morning and shoot from across the street before the local attractions open.
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