Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Biweekly Shoot Out

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 12, 2008, 9:29 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 512
Default

Not sure if this one really fits the bill. But what the heck! I was out in the backyard this morning trying to get some shots of the sun shining through the trees and some fog... Well anyway, I looked down at the bird bath and thought.. Hmmm

So here my take on a shallow DOF. What you see refelected in the water is the apple tree in my backyard. The water in the bird bath is at most 1.5 inches deep in the middle.






NotDadsW41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 12, 2008, 10:15 PM   #2
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

I am not sure how to interpret depth of field in this case. The surface of the water is the closest foreground item. In terms of focus, the reflection of the tree is the background or most distant object. Consequently, it appears to me that you have focused on the most distant object and everything else is fuzzy. Therefore, I don't really see any depth of field.

Cal

calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2008, 6:17 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 512
Default

That's why I was hesitant Cal.

While the tree is a distant object, it is the reflection of the tree on the surface of the water that I was focusing on which I intended to be my close up object.

The distant, out of focus, object in this case was meant to be the remainder of the bird bath.





NotDadsW41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2008, 6:49 PM   #4
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

I thought a lot about this both before and since posting my remarks. When you have a reflection, the reflecting surface is near but the actual reflection behaves the same as if you were shooting the object directly. If you had focused on the edge of the fountain, the fountain and the surface of the water would be in focus but not the reflection. It is the same as shooting something reflected in a mirror. The light rays coming from the reflected object behave the same as if you were directly shooting it. I hope this makes sense.

Try playing around with this concept. Try putting a removable sticker on an outside window. Position yourself so that something is reflected in the window at the same place as the sticker (a mark made with a dry-erase marker would work also). Focus on whatever you placed on the glass. Your reflection will be blurred. However, if you refocus on the reflected object, the marker on the glass will be blurred. All the reflection is doing is bending the light rays so that you can shoot the object from a different angle. The focus and DOF behave as if shooting directly.

I think I have repeated myself about three times but I hope you get the idea. The main thing to understand is that the reflection does not exist on the surface of the reflecting material, whatever it is.

Thinking about reflections, I think it is time to do another challenge on reflections. Stay tuned...

Cal

calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2008, 10:08 PM   #5
daz
Senior Member
 
daz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 436
Default

Cal I am going to say that in my opinion this meets the challenge. Here are my thoughts as to why. I don't know some of the info but we can make some assumptions that should be close.

NotDadsW41 focused on the tree leaf reflection. If we assume he was lets say 3 feet from the water that makes the ground beyond about 5 feet. If we next assume that the tree leafs are 8-14 feet from water we have all of the assumptions.

Now NotDadsW41 used a D40 and a 55mm lens @ f4. This makes the DOF about 1.5-3.5 feet at 10-15 feet. By using the settings he did he narrowed his DOF so only the tree leafs were in focus. The part that makes it hard to see the shallow DOF is he cropped to tight. This was probably part from using the 55mm and part from PP cropping.

If someone takes a macro photo they get a shallow DOF just from it being a macro photo. The hard part is getting a big enough DOF to get all that you want in the photo.

When someone takes a telephoto photo they usually use a small aperture to get a fast shutter speed. With long lenses and the small aperture again the hard part is getting a big enough DOF.

By NotDadsW41 using his medium lens and f-stop he creatively used the DOF to control what he showed in his photo. Not as something that came just from taking a macro or telephoto.

Good creative and clever use of DOF control but needs some work on framing.

DAZ
daz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 14, 2008, 2:01 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 512
Default

Daz on your assumptions:

Nikon D40. 55-200mm VR lens at the time. I am pretty sure I was within 3 ft of the bird bath itself, which is about 2.75 ft tall. End of my lense to the water surface had to be less than 3 feet given I am not quite 6 ft tall. The tree leaves reflected in the water are about 10-12 feet from the surface of the water.

No cropping whatsoever here. I was simply that close and thought I saw something that would work for the challenge. I wasn't sure if it would or not.

Given this is all for fun and learning I thought I'd post it up anyway.

Thanks for looking and commenting Daz!

Calr - I'll give your explainations a shot and see what I see. Thanks!


NotDadsW41 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:56 PM.