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Old Dec 23, 2010, 11:10 PM   #11
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Great series, mntgal! I admire the power in each shot, and how they 'speak' to each other.

If you're able & willing, can you share the technique you used for the 'zoom' shot (e.g. timing, how much 'zoom', etc) - I love the effect, and wish to experiment with that myself.

Regards

Paul
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Old Dec 24, 2010, 1:42 AM   #12
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The zoom shot was taken with a 55-300 zoom lens and I zoomed through the whole range. The picture above was 1.5 sec. shutter speed. I set the camera to ISO 100 and then varied the shutter speed. I used Tv mode and found the first shot tended to over-expose the scene a bit so I set a -.7 Ev. That's something that I wasn't surprised about - normally sunsets/sunrises do well either with spot metering and choosing a spot close to (but not on) the brightest part of the sky, matrix metering will be too influenced by black/dark ground/surroundings. I used several different shutter speeds while zooming, some were too fast and I wasn't able to zoom through the whole range. In another case it was too long (and I zoomed too fast) and I ended up with squiggles at the end of the light trail and a ghost of the pier at 300 mm:



I wish now I had had enough time to re-take this one and didn't knock the camera at the end - it would have been neat to have good trails with the ghost zoomed in pier. But the light was changing so fast and too bright for really long shutter speeds.

The first couple of shots I didn't have the pier centered and the trails from the lower reflected lights went up instead of down (5 seconds, one of the first pictures I took while it was still mostly dark).



A tripod is a must and it would have been better if the tripod hadn't been resting on fairly soft sand, it moved more than it should have. It was a fun exercise to experiment with different shutter and zooming speeds. You can get different effects depending on how you do it, and I was disappointed that my time-window at dawn was so short.
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Old Dec 26, 2010, 8:01 PM   #13
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mtngal

Many MANY thanks for your detailed explanation and examples of your 'zooming' technique for these types of photos.

Reading what you wrote, and seeing your sample shots has helped me appreciate the 'logic' to it (e.g. exposure time, how long to hold at different focal ranges for the photo).

It certainly brings a few new elements of photographic challenge to execute this well.

Yes, I could imagine a tripod is a must (thankfully I have a good one now). I can understand about the 'sinking in a bit' in soft sand even being undesirable.

I'll try this sometime....

Cheers

Paul
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