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Old Oct 26, 2011, 7:10 AM   #1
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Default On the street where I live - East and West

Hi Biweekly shoot out friends

Nothing 'spectacular' - but I thought to simply show the view roughly due west and roughly due east from my home.

Here is the 'west view' (on Monday 24 Oct 2011).

The tall tree in front of my home is an 18 metre (about 50 foot tall) eucalyptus tree.

PS... please ignore the few weeds growing in the very front of my front yard... between the shrubs LOL.
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Old Oct 26, 2011, 7:13 AM   #2
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Default East view

And this photo (almost due east view) was taken 24 hours and 15 minutes later (on Tuesday 25 Oct 2011). At 17:48 (5:48pm). You can see Tuesday was a nice sunny evening... whereas Monday was overcast.

I had slow & intermittent internet for some reason yesterday so I wanted to wait till it was ok before I uploaded.

The street I live on is a cull-de-sac (dead end road) on this side, which is nice, so I don't get much traffic going right past my home.

And for those who didn't know (yet) - yes we drive on the left hand side of the road in Australia!



Regards

Paul
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Old Oct 26, 2011, 7:56 AM   #3
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Looking at your houses, all one story. Do you have basements? I suppose basements are more common to places where the weather gets cold.
That eucalyptus tree is one big sucker. I guess they didnt take that into account when they built the sidewalk. Nice shots Paul, and even nicer street, looks nice and open and clean looking with a big open sky.
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Old Oct 26, 2011, 9:07 AM   #4
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A lovely neighborhood, I could see living there very easily.

Question about the eucalyptus tree - how long do they live in Australia? They grow very well in Southern California and are often planted/grown as ornamental trees. However, it seems like they don't live very long - some 40 or 50 year old trees had to be cut down as they were no longer safe and two fell in winter wind storms one year. There was quite an uproar by those who thought they were being sacrificed for a construction project, rather than cut down for safety. I wondered if they live longer in their native environment.
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Old Oct 26, 2011, 7:33 PM   #5
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Hi Bynx

Thanks for your post and keen eye.

Yes, in my neighbourhood all houses are single storey. Some parts of the larger cities in Australia will have a few apartment blocks, but these are much in the minority, and apartment blocks will either be in the city (often expensive to buy / rent - but convenient if you want to live in the CBD "central business district"). Most 'average suburbs' have single storey homes - though some people subdivide an average sized 700 square metres 'block' of land (about 7500 sq feet) - and then build a 'town house' (two storey, home with smaller footprint) on it. This is what people do for investment purposes also.

Most homes do not have basements here. A few (mainly older homes) do - as they were built before electricity / fridges, and particularly to keep food cooler - or wine! I remember as a young boy seeing movies from eg Canada and the US - and the idea of a 'basement' was very foreign (& interesting!) to me.

Yes, I think you're right.... basements can be particularly handy where the climate is colder. I remember in Romania seeing some houses having basements (and even apartment blocks have a 'communal' basement). In Adelaide, South Australia where I live - I've seen some 'old homes' as well as several wineries having basements. The old 'colonial built' buildings in our world famous Barossa Valley & McLaren Vale regions (north and south of the metro area) that have many many vineyards will have many basements to keep wine at more constant temperatures... though of course modern technology and 'climate control' can mitigate a lot of that!

The eucalyptus (gum) tree is 'reasonably tall' but not actually very 'big' (breadth and 'branch span wise' compared to many gum trees. I grew up on a few acres in Tasmania, and we had much bigger gum trees there, and there are some gum trees in the front garden of a house just 2 away from my home (just out view of photo #2) - and they are much 'bigger' (probably a bit taller... but a lot 'more mass' and timber).
Keen eye about how the gum tree affects the sidewalk (which we call a 'footpath' in Australia). Yes, its roots have 'buckled' the footpath there, and at times new 'softer' lining is placed to cover it up. (To be honest I'd rather the tree isn't there).

What you wrote about the nice, clean open sky- yes indeed it is here - not always, but it is a lot. Over the day, we have an average of 8 hours of sunshine per day. Less in winter and more in winter. Particularly when I lived in London, I realised how little I saw the 'big blue sky' a) because of the number of apartments or multi-storey buildings b) roads are narrower c) the climate / weather - meant there were a lot more 'cloudy days' - particularly in the 'cooler part' of the year.

Cheers, mate.

Paul
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Old Oct 26, 2011, 7:58 PM   #6
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Hi mtngal

Thanks for your kind comments, and that you could see living here easily. I do indeed consider myself blessed to live where I do now. It's certainly not a posh neighbourhood, quite 'middle of the road'. Having been involved for over a decade doing charity work in developing countries, I realise I have nothing to complain about. There are millions of people who don't even have a roof over their heads or a wholesome daily meal.

I'm glad you asked about eucalyptus trees. There are many many different types of eucalyptus trees, and the longevity varies according to species, and the specific environment they are in. I grew up in Tasmania - the island state off the south of the 'mainland' of Australia. Tasmania is cooler and wetter than where I live now, in Adelaide - which is about 10 degrees closer to the equater and much nearer inland dessert.

Because the climate of southern California is similar to some parts of Australia (eg where I live) I could imagine that some do grow well, and would make an attractive / exotic ornamental tree. Some gum trees would only live about 40 to 50 years, because they are a fast growing species, OR they might be more prone to diseases when they get to that stage. But others live to be hundreds of years old.

The specific tree in front of my home is a type of gum that grows relatively tall, but which is also notorious for dropping limbs without warning, and sometimes large ones. I have written to the council on a few occasions (firstly to express my concern about safety, as there is a school a few blocks away, so children walk past every day). I also wrote to cover myself for any insurance issues (eg if friends of mine have parked their car under that tree). The tree is actually on council property (the 'nature strip') and so it's not on my land.

As it is classified as a 'significant' tree, that is: it is of a size that means it can not be cut down unless council approval is given. A few limbs have fallen from this tree, which would have caused serious injury (or even death) if it 'hit the person at the wrong time on the head'. The council sent a few independent aborists round who did an inspection of the tree (from the ground and up by climbing in the tree). On a scale it was rated still as 'safe' (though admitted it was not in 'perfect health').

I love trees (and the animals that they support and attract - eg often in mornings and evenings I have rainbow lorikeets, magpies, rosellas and other parrot species roosting and feeding in it). But still I'd prefer the tree to be removed, mainly because of the safety issues it could present. Adelaide is a city where for some reason over history they have allow large gum trees to be over main streets, near homes, etc. I know in other parts of the country, this would not have been allowed.

Well... that is quite a long answer (and a bit of a rant... lol) to the 'tree' issue. I do love the shadow of the tree in photo #2.

Paul
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 8:56 AM   #7
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It looks like a nice, peaceful neighborhood. Vera flat land by the looks of it!
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 5:21 PM   #8
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Many thanks Tullio, for your comments.

Yes, it is a peaceful neighbourhood. A few cars come through the intersection that you can see in the 1st photo, but thankfully it's fairly quiet (apart from the occasional 'hoon'- which can happen anywhere).

The actual part of the street where my house is on is quite flat indeed. However further along (as far as you can see in photo #1) - the road dips down. Most of Adelaide sits on a relatively narrow stretch of flat plain between the coast and the "Adelaide Hills" (Mount Lofty range), though some suburbs (particularly in or near the foothills) are elevated and have steep sections. I'm about 7 minutes drive from the Adelaide Hills.

I live in a suburb that is _____ "Heights" - and yes, it is raised above other suburbs around me. If I stand on my roof I have a view that looks 'down' towards the sea in the west and I can see the hills in the east (which is just out of view of photo #2). From street level out the front of my place there is no 'view'.... shame. I don't think I ever realised the joy of a view (that I had in Tasmania) - till I left!

Cheers!

Paul
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 9:04 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pj1974 View Post
Hi mtngal

Thanks for your kind comments, and that you could see living here easily. I do indeed consider myself blessed to live where I do now. It's certainly not a posh neighbourhood, quite 'middle of the road'. Having been involved for over a decade doing charity work in developing countries, I realise I have nothing to complain about. There are millions of people who don't even have a roof over their heads or a wholesome daily meal.


Paul
I find your words inspiring, Paul!
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Old Oct 30, 2011, 4:13 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by saly View Post
I find your words inspiring, Paul!
Thanks saly.

Your kind & direct reply is appreciated. I've learned after living in a developing country situation, that while it is easy to 'go with what we want' - more contentment is achieved by seeing what is really needed in life, and focussing on helping those who have less than I / we do.

Wishing you a good Sunday evening / night (it's Monday morning here!)

Regards.

Paul
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