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Old Feb 11, 2012, 12:27 AM   #1
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Default Seeing Red

mmm I have a bunch of red photos. We will start with these.

Red Head
Red Truck
Red Rock

Cheers,
Bill

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Old Feb 11, 2012, 9:53 AM   #2
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Three very different tones of red. I like the rooster shot best.
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Old Feb 12, 2012, 8:27 PM   #3
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The cockscomb shows a bit of the over saturation Calr is talking about.
That third shot a keeper to hang on your wall.
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Old Feb 12, 2012, 11:26 PM   #4
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Selvin,

I believe a lot of this red issue is improper metering (by the photog or the camera) when taking the photo or post processing (can be photog or camera on this also) issues. If you use matrix metering like in the shot of the limo and red carpet, I would expect the red carpet to be the brightest thing in the frame. Was it over exposed by the camera? or became over exposed during post processing to bring the lighting levels up for the rest of the photo to be usable?

Here are two enlargements of the rooster's head. One is right out of the camera with sharpening only and not color or levels adjustment. The second is sharpened and levels adjusted.

They both show perfectly good definition in the red zone. However, I usually bracket or shoot at a -1 ev to avoid blowing highlights. I check the histograms on most every shot. Today's cameras let you view all three histograms (red, green, blue). If you check those you will see which one is being over exposed and can adjust exposure to compensate. This is just good practice of the craft of photography. I am not convinced there is a problem with digital cameras and the color red.

If you let a camera make the decisions and any adjustments to your photos before downloading you can sometimes get things you don't want (ie. over saturation, lost highlights, etc). You must know how the settings in your camera are going to affect the end product before you set them. Shooting RAW format is very beneficial in saving some photos, but will not generally compensate for a blown highlight. Feed back from the camera is there to assist photogs in decision making. These are not point and shoot tools.
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Old Feb 12, 2012, 11:52 PM   #5
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Here, I went back to the raw file and only denoised, adjusted exposure, and sharpened. As you can see there does not appear to be a loss of detail in the red area. It is a little soft but that rooster was not exactly sitting still. I believe the photo was at 1/1000 sec, iso 100, f8, 18mm focal length.

The above images were processed from the jpg files.

Cheers,
Bill
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