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Old Feb 25, 2004, 6:26 PM   #1
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Default Breaking things, my way

This is one that I took last month, but it fits the challenge so I thought I'd go ahead and post it. The center of interest is in the exact center of the picture, framed by the branches. I think that although this image breaks the rules, it works in this instance.



Unfortunately, the whites on the hummingbird are a bit blown out.
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Old Feb 25, 2004, 7:04 PM   #2
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I agree. It works admirably. You wouldn't want that bird anywhere else. However, notice how the branches are sitting in an interesting triangle pattern, two of the largest neatly dividing the canvas into thirds. You did a whole lot better than I did, but that danged rule is nevertheless skulking about in your foliage.
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Old Feb 25, 2004, 7:31 PM   #3
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I knew that was going to be mentioned Although the center of interest was out of the boundaries of the rule, the entire image tends to lend itself well to the rule.

Since this was taken prior to the challenge, I am still planning on coming up with a shot taken within the week of the challenge.
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Old Feb 25, 2004, 8:33 PM   #4
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nice picture

btw......the rule of thirds......does it mean right at the grid junctions? or in the far boxes?
cuz i've taken some sunsets with the sun right on the edge of the image (doesn't really look that good though)
but is that breaking the rule?
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Old Feb 25, 2004, 11:08 PM   #5
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if you're dividing both horizontal and vertical planes into thirds (and you must be or you wouldn't have grids) yes the rule is that the focus of the subject should fall at one or more of the intersecting lines.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 9:11 AM   #6
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I have some thoughts on this business about thirds after seeing what happened in my photo and now in yours, Carl, but I'm not sure these thoughts will amount to much, so I'll wait until more people have posted their pictures. (No, I'm not being coy, just cautious.)
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 10:17 AM   #7
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In my opinion, the rule of thirds applies to the entire picture, not just the subject. The rule suggests where to place the subject, but does not demand that. In pictures such as this one, the branches frame the subject and become part of the overall image instead of just background. The branches tend to set up the eyes to focus on the subject, plus the angles and location of the branches pretty much adhere to a balanced composition.

The same shot without the surrounding branches would have been an acceptable shot for a book that you wanted to show what a Anna's Hummingbird looked like, but would fail as an asthetic picture.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 11:12 AM   #8
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Yes, that's the conclusion I'm coming to also--that the notion of thirds applies to the picture as a whole.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 10:36 PM   #9
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O'Henry,

I am glad you mentioned the fact that the "rule of thirds" applies mainly to aesthetic shots. Pictures meant primarily to teach about or describe things may not necessarily adhere to this rule.
Thus the purpose for the photo also carries quite a bit of weight in determining the composition.

Barbara, Wonderful idea you've got going here.

Aloha.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 11:14 PM   #10
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ohenry...

you have created the ultimate everywhere center of interest photo, where no center of interest exists because everywhere you look is a center of interest. The colors and values are similar all over, the focal point seems to be all over the "canvas." How did you do this? The bird is in focus, yet is behind those little branches that are also in focus, and other branches behind seem to be in focus, yet between a blur seems to exist. You have not only broken the rule of thirds here, from what I can see you have broken the boundaries of nature itself. I was looking forward to seeing something that you had created and I'm not disappointed. All of that technical stuff you offered in kindness has finally translated into something I can understand, a great photo! The similarity in color and value between the tree and the bird are nothing less than astonishing, to the point that it even seems to trick the focus of the eyeball.

Nice shot!
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