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Old Mar 8, 2004, 11:11 PM   #11
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Rod, I have just come back from a trip through your Web site, and am a bit embarassed about presuming to give you any suggestions. But, what the heck, this is all just teamwork, and we're all here because we enjoy sharing this stuff. Your pleasure in seeing comes through strongly in your work, and your vision is strong enough that even the thumbnails are powerful, with strong form and beautiful light.

Fill-in flash is an amazing tool, and modern cameras do a miraculous job of balancing it with ambient light, especially when they provide the control to tune it down a bit. I've used it for people pictures, but was turned on to its more general use in a nature photography workshop, of all things, last fall. I'm glad this issue came up, because I needed a reminder of the technique myself.

But, there is nothing wrong with letting the shadows go black and letting the highlights tell the story, as you have shown. (There is another assignment, Barbara.)

After seeing your work, now I am really hoping that Barbara gives us some kind of industrial/cityscape assignment. I at least, need to stretch a bit and get away from the birds and butterflys for a while.
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Old Mar 8, 2004, 11:20 PM   #12
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Suzan, I love your signature. Reminds me of a label riveted on to a wood stove my wife and I once used to keep our family warm:

"Caution, this appliance get hot when in operation."
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Old Mar 9, 2004, 7:11 AM   #13
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Right here in this thread is a fine example of our goal: learning or remembering technique. Methods and equipment for getting detail in highs and lows--these are essential for good photography, probably right up there beneath having an actual camera.

Thank you, Rod, for making the mysterious a little less mysterious. Because of where you took the photo, I recognized a lost opportunity of last summer at a tugboat rally when I didn't think to convince one of the captains to allow me onboard.

Also, thank you for the compliment.
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Old Mar 9, 2004, 9:37 AM   #14
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Tony:

Thank you for the compliment. I have a long way to go and am experimenting all the time and leaning new techniques. Next time I am on the barge, I will try the fill-in flash. I never thought of that technique.

What I have discovered by viewing other photographer's work is, there are many good photographers out there from the record shot to the composite image artwork. Your work is outstanding as are many others at this forum and on the Internet.

Barbara:

Tugs, barges, machinery and industrial settings are wonderful places to photograph. I want to do some photo work in a machine shop and a metal fabrication shop in our area. Most of these little shops, when they are not busy, are more than happy to let you work, providing you stay out of their way and do not disturb the workspace. Hard toed boots or shoes and long pants/slacks are a must in these places. If you have them, steel toes shoes are my choice. A bag off cookie after finishing your work or a framed print make nice gift.

The reason I photograph is because I enjoy the visual image process. I obtain a great deal of joy from the "printmaking" process in the "lightroom." At the same time, it is a learning process and the "one image" is always around the next bend.

rod
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Old Mar 9, 2004, 11:03 AM   #15
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Hi Rod,

You have an obvious knowledge of working boats!

Your photo is stark and it works.

FYI...

Should you ever be in the Midwest, I might suggest the museum
at Dubuque, Ia which has quite a few exhibits (and one intact
riverboat) re life on the Mississippi many years ago.

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Old Mar 9, 2004, 12:31 PM   #16
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Quote:
a metal fabrication shop
Just by chance, my husband is embarking on a second career in metal fabrication and welding. If he doesn't get his shop set up soon, I'll turn inside out. And yup, I know the dangers. My dad was a metalsmith, so I grew up both seeing and being warned about dire injuries. Nevertheless, once we have a camera to our eye, we can forget and become reckless, so your warnings are a welcome reminder.
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Old Mar 9, 2004, 9:44 PM   #17
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Rod,
Even with the shdow detail on the housing lost, I very much like your image. I think in this case, the lack of detail really doesnt take away from the overall effect of the pic. Keep up the good work!
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