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Old Apr 9, 2004, 11:52 AM   #11
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Barbara: At least that is what I learned 30 years ago. I am taking a class where the instructor wants us to always use the image we take: no cropping, etc. I may have to change my mind becasue that is more difficult then I thought.
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Old Apr 9, 2004, 12:25 PM   #12
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Great shot (--and I wudda cloned the grass away and never told a soul!)
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Old Apr 9, 2004, 12:34 PM   #13
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Gil, your instructor isn't wrong. The composition and as much of the technique as possible should be done in the camera. You should be trying to get the best picture possible when you press the shutter release. The only problem is when this concept is carried to its extreme, when no room is given at all for artistic vision. To do this is to severely limit the world of photography. If this were the criterion for excellence, then many of the great photographers would have been kicked out of the ballpark years ago.

If you think about Toners' photo, think about the logistics involved in his even managing to capture those deer, then think about that long blade of grass begging for more attention than it deserves, you'll realize that he couldn't very well go up to the deer and say, "Excuse me, madam, but would you mind if I just plucked this out of the way?" Nor could he possibly have ignored the shot because it wasn't utterly perfect. On top of that, when the capability exists to remove such slight imperfections, and this isn't done, how has such a purist point of view made the world of photography any better?

Yes, get the very best picture you can right inside your camera, but don't deny yourself the benefit of making it even better when you process it.

Oh, I could go on and on about this. Actually, it looks as if I have. :shock:
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Old Apr 9, 2004, 12:52 PM   #14
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wow....that is one of the best explanation of y manipulation isn't "ruining" the picture...just making it better....or not making it "fake" just simplifying it.....

spectacular picture tonars
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 6:14 AM   #15
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I agree with everyone here (and it seems like we are arguing on the same side). I was also taught to get it best you can in the camera - and touch up best you can with the tools available to you.
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 5:40 PM   #16
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I am only going to say one thing about this Pic Awsome!!! How Did you get so close?
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 7:13 PM   #17
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Bet he used a long lens. And it most certainly IS an awesome pic.
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 10:49 PM   #18
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I'd headed out on a foggy evening looking for a group of deer I had been seeing during previous evenings in a nearby meadow. No luck, but driving home the flicker of an ear of one of these "lawn ornaments" caught my eye. I remained in my pickup - vehicles make wonderful blinds - and backed into position, then braced the tripod legs on the floor and the camera against the window sill, and very carefully squeezed off several shots. I think my 70-300 Nikkor was out to about 200mm. I was really pleased to see that the image was very sharp.

Thanks for the interesting discussion, and the nice comments. The grass stem is going to get plucked.
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 5:54 PM   #19
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Toners:

As usual, you always bring home the story - very professional. I like the composition and the use of DOF to keep the stag in the backgroud but still in the photo. This is definitely a potental entry for Naturesbestmagazine.com, etc. You asked about removing the grass stems. I always ask, What would a National Geographic Editor do?" I think we all can guess the answer.

The photo is outstanding and reflects your mastery of the craft - excellent work.

rod
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