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Old Apr 10, 2004, 11:26 PM   #1
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Default DOF: Lavender and Rock Rose

Hope this gives you a feeling of bees buzzing and butterflies dancing to an April morning . . .

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Old Apr 11, 2004, 6:24 AM   #2
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Toners, how clever and pretty! A triptych - who'da thunk it? And so well done. Spring is defniately in the air!
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 9:55 AM   #3
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Toners: nice shot. But please remember we have kids looking at these images (Vito) who may not know what hankey pankey is.
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 11:34 AM   #4
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...but he probably does know what the birds and the bees are !
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 11:50 AM   #5
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You just turned me into an old grouch, Toners. Spring is extremely late here in the supposedly great Northeast.

Are these three separately shot photos or are they slices of the same photo? It looks a bit like the latter to me.
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 12:12 PM   #6
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These are three separate images, all taken while I was lying in the same patch of lavender, to some annoyance of the bees. The left and right are an attempt at the sub-challenge I gave myself, which was to make two images from the same camera position, both more or less successful in their own right, with different focus points. It was way harder than I thought it would be.

From the first time I put an SLR to my eye, and that was mrmblmmmmf years ago, I was enthralled with the way parts of images - bright flowers, sparkles on water - could shimmer in and out of focus. At one point I went through way to long a period where blurry bright flowers or fall leaves cast a foreground haze in many photos!
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 12:35 PM   #7
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Then I was kinda, sorta right...maybe...well, not really.

The photo on the right reminds me of the method used to eliminate wire fences at zoos, a method I've never tested. If you'd wanted to, would you have been able to fairly well eliminate the nearest flowers in the third shot without physically stomping them to the ground?
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 12:52 PM   #8
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would you have been able to fairly well eliminate the nearest flowers in the third shot
I don't think so - the flowers are bright enough that they would add a color cast. Should work with a grey or black chain link fence, though, but you would need to be really close and use a large aperture, I think.
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 1:03 PM   #9
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Default This is how we learn . . .

Wanna hear a confession? Sometimes mistakes are good teachers or reminders. Since I have begun shooting in RAW mode, I have become sloppy about checking my camera settings, like color balance, contrast, etc., since the RAW conversion allows you to make those choices after the fact. But I had been shooting in jpeg for some quick documentary photos, and left it that way for the lavender series. Trouble was, the camera was also set for tungsten light and high contrast. Photoshop's autocolor did a pretty good job of removing the cyan/blue cast, though you can still see a hint of it. But the highlights were irrecoverably blown out. The result was (just barely) acceptable for the Web, but that triptych will never make it to my refrigerator gallery.

The lesson then is to make a point of reviewing those settings whenever you fire up the camera.
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Old Apr 11, 2004, 2:37 PM   #10
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You just sent me back to my camera's manual to check what, if any, settings are honored in RAW mode. According to what I read, the photo will be as "originally shot, unaffected by white balance, sharpness, contrast, or color correction. The data is used just as it was received from the CCD." So, from this, I have to conclude that your and my cameras are extremely different. Or am I misunderstanding and, in fact, you weren't shooting the lavender in RAW mode?
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