Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Biweekly Shoot Out

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 13, 2004, 11:07 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
ohenry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,676
Default

No photoshop work done, just developed jpg image from RAW. What's it need?


ohenry is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 13, 2004, 11:56 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
discodudette's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,420
Default

Wow! Lotsa circles! And the nice sickly green makes the pink bud just POP! Great great shot! you may be challenging Calr for Circle King!
discodudette is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 12:10 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
ohenry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,676
Default

Circles for Discodudette:


ohenry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 12:15 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
photosbyvito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,710
Default

there it is!! i really like this shot! the DOF field in the second one is perfect....you can still see wat's in the background, but it isn't sharp...well done

definetely putting up a fight against the "circle king"! haha
photosbyvito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 10:00 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Quote:
No photoshop work done, just developed jpg image from RAW. What's it need?
Needs some Levels work plus some Hue/Saturation. Just that plus USM...and I can't think of a dad-blamed thing more! It's nice when a photo needs no more than the basic adjustments, isn't it?
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 10:08 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
ohenry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,676
Default

Thanks, Barbara. Fortunately, after years of SLR use and many many many bad photos, I generally don't have a lot of Photoshop work to do in most instances. Just the usual digital adjustments you mentioned. My typical workflow for a print is:

1. RAW to TIFF (adjust exposure and white balance, no sharpening, slight color saturation)

2. Correct for any color casts

3. Adjust contrast using curves to my liking.

4. Tweak hue/saturation, if needed

5. Save as master (prior to any sharpening or resizing)

5a. Crop/resize as needed for print/website, then sharpen to taste.

Here's theshopped photo doing justthe work as described. (removed color cast, set an S curve in curves to increase contrast, added a smidge of hue saturation, added the border and signature,sharpened a bit, saved for web, and uploaded) Total time maybe 10 minutes.




Interesting. Although the changes were very evident on my computer, when I uploaded the file to the web there doesn't seem to be as dramatic of a difference. JPG compression is nice for file size, but it sure doesn't help images
ohenry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 11:46 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Before I scrolled down beneath the picture, I was thinking of telling you that compression had obliteratedyour changes. This always drives me nuts and often takes more time to fix than the original adjustments to the photo...

Assuming you're using Adobe RGB as your color space, convert it to sRGB. Then slightly exaggerate both contrast and saturation, checking how it looks in Save for Web, then doing any further adjustments you think needed before actually saving it as a JPEG. Some photos need a lot of tinkering and some don't seem to need much of anything. I find that pictures with a lot of yellow and red in them end up looking washed right out unless I increase saturation and deepen the shadows. I'm sure there's a logical explanation for all this, but knowing only how to fix it is works just fine. Don't want tofill up my head with facts when there's alreadyso little room left.
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 11:49 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
photosbyvito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,710
Default

hmm.....i've actually hadn't had problems like this before, the "web version" of my shots aren't a huge difference from the "presaved version" in photoshop....except i can see them better because i don't have the pallettes blocking it...lol

of course...i've been using sRGB all the time (didn't know you could change it...or how you would...lol) but i do now...
photosbyvito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 11:54 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

If you're printing your photos, you'll want to use Adobe RGB because it's a larger color space.
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2004, 12:35 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
photosbyvito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,710
Default

is the color space that the printer use large enough for the change to make a difference?

this month's "Outdoor Photographer" had a couple of articles on printing....and preparing to print, and a complete workflow for digital (prepare for shooting, setting the settings, shoot, download, "enhance", archive, output) and that sort of things...and one about preparing to print was talking about Adobe RGB 1998 (different than the one you use right? cuz you have CS...) but it said that the color gamut used by printers is smaller than any color space....i'm guessing there are hightech printers (the newer ones.....the i9900 for example) that have larger gamut....but mine is an oldy....an HP 970 or somethin...so i don't think the gamut would be near good enough for it to make a big difference....

lol...long paragraph for a forum post

Vito
photosbyvito is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:39 AM.