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Old Jun 17, 2004, 3:28 AM   #11
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Nice shot. :-)
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 8:08 AM   #12
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RGRotts wrote:
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I would suspect it may be a very sophisticated, programmable router.
Last night, I questioned the great repository of useless fact and, of course, there were useless facts to be found. You're right. Computer templates. Anyway, that's how gravestones are done. This explains why I'm always drawn to the oldest part of any cemetery. More touch of human than of machine. Those little imperfections are somehow more beautiful.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 8:11 AM   #13
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I've longbeen considering a series of photo of just the kind of stones your refer to.....
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 8:13 AM   #14
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In this case and it's companions, and similarly in the new state quarters, it's the design and original artists workvs. the medium and method which are admirable.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 8:46 AM   #15
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RGRotts wrote:
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In this case and it's companions, and similarly in the new state quarters, it's the design and original artists workvs. the medium and method which are admirable.
You're absolutely correct. Before any sort of machine or computer, there's that very real human being sitting down with pencil and paper to create the design.

Cemeteries are wonderful places in which to spend whole days. I've been drawn to them since I was a little kid when I first discovered their constant whisper of stories. It began with a tiny, forgotten cemetery on a hill where the oldest stone markedthe grave of a young woman born in the late 1700's. Her name was Sally.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 8:56 AM   #16
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I feel the same way about gravestones. I went to a cemetery a few weeks ago and all the bright and shiny marble with gold engraving didn't sit right with me (my apologies if anyone was offended by that, I'm not trying to cause any). Instead I was drawn towards to older ones. Even some young ones from the early 90's looked better. The polished marble looked brand new with little or no wear. That is when I decided that if I have a gravestone I just want a plain stone one with my name and dates. I'm hoping to catch the vicar (or for someone else to) so I can get permission to take pictures of the church and the gravestones. Some are over a hundred years old and with many addictions. Quiet a few had the father first, a few years later the wife and then a long time later the only child. There was one there with two or three people (forget exactly) and then at the bottom of the stone "Also lays nearby..." with the names of three children none older than 18 months.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 9:02 AM   #17
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This is one which really got to me. The beauty of the granite alone, let alone that it's my great grandparents headstone, just blew me away when I first saw it (as an imaginative adult) . Actually it was heavily obscured by surrounding shrubbery which I asked the cemetary to trim. They sort of grilled me as to who I was, why I was asking and that if on "our" lot, there would be a fee. Little did they know that my bowsaw was ready to make shortwork of itif they refused.......when no one was looking of course....

I have an uncle who died at only 5 months of age buried nearby here also, unmarked and nearly forgotten. My dad's life was nearly over before I ever learned of him.....

http://img70.photobucket.com/albums/...s/home0819.jpg

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Old Jun 17, 2004, 9:26 AM   #18
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One of the things that struck me when walking around was the young age at which lots of the people died. Sure there were some 70's and 90's but far more children. That, and as I said, how many graves had more than one person. There were a couple where there had been space left on the stone which was quite obviously left there to be written on at a later stage. Behind every stone is a story, one that we'll never know.
The local graveyard only keeps people for 100 years I think. After that you get a friend to play with. It isn't very big. The church is only down the road but is isolated really. Only one house which is next to it. The village that it belongs to is further away than we are. The only reason we are nearer is because of town expansion. I heard the reason for it being so far away is because of the plague. People who had the plague were buried there and the village moved to get away from it.
There is another church in the town centre which could be older, I don't know. It's bigger and so is its graveyard.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 9:48 AM   #19
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RGRotts wrote:
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I have an uncle who died at only 5 months of age buried nearby here also, unmarked and nearly forgotten. My dad's life was nearly over before I ever learned of him.....
All my greats and great-greats are buried in various places in New York City, and I've a cousin who spent several weeks tracking down all cemeteries that contained graves with the family name. He took photos of every last one, but in the process, we discovered relatives we'd never known about.

Ferny, are you saying they dig up the grave, pull out the casket, take down the headstone, and thus make room for new members? If for no other reason, it's very sad for history.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 10:15 AM   #20
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No, they dig a new hole in or around the same spot. After 100 years there isn't much left to dig up. The wood and flesh has gone and if there is any bone then I'd imagine they'd deal with that when they dig the new hole. Out of the view of the relatives of the new occupant. It's only a small graveyard and with the population in the world increasing what choice do they have? Of course, if you have relatives still willing to pay for the plot then I'd imagine they'd leave you be. But after 100 years I doubt there will be anyone who would know about me.
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