Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Biweekly Shoot Out

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 17, 2004, 1:18 PM   #1
blr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 339
Default

Here it comes following our discussion in the other moonshot topic I decided to post one of mine. I should say that the original idea still belongs 100% to Selvin who posted the first moonshot
Attached Images
 
blr is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 17, 2004, 1:22 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
jackrussell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,191
Default

Nice one blr, have you got a 10x zoom too ?.:-)
jackrussell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 1:26 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
ferny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,866
Default

That's not the moon. That's a ball. Look, I can see the valve at the bottom. :lol:

But in all seriousness. That is well taken. I like how you can see the creators on the bottom left edge. May I ask how you took this? I'd like to give it a go with my spotting scope but it'll be extremely difficult for reasons which I won't go into.
ferny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 1:34 PM   #4
blr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 339
Default

jackrussell wrote:
Quote:
Nice one blr, have you got a 10x zoom too ?.:-)
Thanks. The image was taken through a 3 inch refractor telescope with a total magnification of something like 30x, which will correspond tosomething like1500mm lens (35mm film equivalent).The shot is actually not even close to the beauty one sees through the telescope. People that specialize in astrophotography and lunar photography in particular have taken breathtaking shots of isolated areas of the moon with plenty of details visible. My efforts are rather modest .

Ferny, the image was taken using eyepiece projection technique. This means that you attach your camera with the lens to the eyepiece of the telescope. There are adapters made for different cameras. They can be rather costly though. Alternatively, you can simply hold the camera to the eyepiece (be careful not to scratch or otherwize damage the lens in the dark). You focus the camera at infinity and adjust the focus of the scope until the image is sharp. This is the tricky part, since the screen is not very accurate. Another tricky bit is to avoid vigneting. Use the lowest power eyepice and zoom in the camera lens. Closing down the aperture also helps
blr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 2:01 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

That DOES look like a valve at the bottom. What is it?

Anyway, this is one fine shot. Was it originally in b&w?
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 4:01 PM   #6
blr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 339
Default

bcoultry wrote:
Quote:
That DOES look like a valve at the bottom. What is it?

Anyway, this is one fine shot. Was it originally in b&w?
If you talk about the big crater with lots of rays originating from it , it's named Tycho after the big Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe. Actually all of the moon craters are named most often after scientists. Tycho is the most prominent feature seen at the full moons face. The rays were created when a large asteroid struck the moon and huge amounts of the lunar crust were spread all over the surface. Since the lunar gravity is 6 times weaker than the Earths, the ejected mass could ravel far before falling back down on the lunar surface.

Oh, this started to sound like an astro forum, sorry.
blr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 4:25 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Don't apologize.I've never truly looked at the moon. Like so many people, I've just always accepted its presence,not taking the time to learn about it. The next time I've a clear view of it, I'm going to take the binoculars to it.

Thank you for the explanation.
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 5:59 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
ferny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,866
Default

If I aim my scope at the moon I can get it to fill the eye piece. The tricky part will be getting the camera up to it as I only have one big tripod and one weedy one and getting it to focus. Then I'll have to hope the camera can cope with all the light. It's not an ideal set-up.
I've seen the adaptors to fit my film camera but wouldn't get enough use to justify the cost. I'll just have to look at yours instead.
ferny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 6:05 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
geoffs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,025
Default

blr, that's not a half bad photo of the moon. So, you attached your digicam to your 3" refractor to do this. What kind of camera and what attachments did you use to secure it to the scope? I assume you were using eyepiece projection? I'm looking to do the same thing with my camera but there aren't yet attachments for my Oly C-8080WZ - real soon now is what I hear...

Here's the best I've been able to do by handholding my camera up as best I could to the eyepiece of my 4.5" richfield reflector:


Attached Images
 
geoffs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2004, 8:36 PM   #10
Moderator
 
selvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 7,204
Default

blr,

that's a vey nice shot. I've thought about buying a telescope but never had enough courage to explain it to my wife.

Aloha
selvin is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:09 PM.