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Old Jun 19, 2004, 10:07 AM   #21
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I've several, and it's the best I've found for general use. Closely related are the dictionaries of slang. As amusing as they are, they also tend to be a different take on history.
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 10:20 AM   #22
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Is this one in the book Barbara ?. "Where there's muck there's brass." I always wondered where that onecame from. :-)
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 12:24 PM   #23
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jackrussell wrote:
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Is this one in the book Barbara ?. "Where there's muck there's brass." I always wondered where that onecame from. :-)
I just looked it up, but it's not there. I wonder if mine is an American version. "Muck" is, I think, more common on the British Isles than here in the pristine States.



That little leapy dude is actually supposed to be the raspberry thrower. These smilies are in a tangled mess. You might call them all mucked up.
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 1:35 PM   #24
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I'm fairly sure it's a Northern saying here in England. I always thought it was related to mining because mines were the major employers in many Northern towns.:-)
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 2:21 PM   #25
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It could well be as you suppose. Though brass isn't something you can mine for, if they were digging up a component of brass, then they probably also did metal manufacturing. Come to think of it, if they were mining coal, metalsmithing would be a natural industry to move into the area.

Now you've gotten my curiosity up. What did they mine for?
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 2:32 PM   #26
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Sorry, i should have explained better. Brass is a slang term for money so what the phrase means is really "Where there's dirt there's money." :-)They were actually mining for coal.
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 2:45 PM   #27
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Isn't it amusing how we speak the same language, but not always?:-)
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 2:47 PM   #28
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You should hear how i speak, Lancashire dialect may sound strange to some. :-)

Have a look at this. http://www.nyt.co.uk/lankytalk.htm
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 3:42 PM   #29
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The page cracked me up. You don't really speak like that, do you?:-)



--Barbara Coultry
Olympus E-20N, FL-40, M-CON-35, TCON-300, Epson 1270
http://home.nycap.rr.com/coultry/pages/index.htm


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Old Jun 19, 2004, 3:46 PM   #30
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My grandad spoke exactly like that but i'm not that bad. I think the dialect is slowly fading away. I don't hear many people speak it that strongly any more. I try to type in English even though i don't sound like Prince Charles. :-)
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