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Old Jun 19, 2004, 4:05 PM   #31
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This reminds me of a train trip I took many years ago when I sat next to a stranger who happened to be from Australia. He was quite the chatty fellow, and he talked for mile after mile, but I understood nothing he said. Not a word. I hope some Aussies are listening in and can tell me if, in a certain section of the country, there's a dialect so deep that they can't evenunderstand themselves.

--Barbara Coultry
Olympus E-20N, FL-40, M-CON-35, TCON-300, Epson 1270
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 4:31 PM   #32
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I'm not sure about other parts of England but in Lancashire the dialect can change between towns just a few miles apart. I also know a few people who can't understand a word from a Scottish person even though it's not that far away. :-)
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 4:52 PM   #33
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The infernal Tower of Babel.
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Old Jun 19, 2004, 8:56 PM   #34
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Superb...elegance personified, Jack Russell

I concur with Bcoultry's astute observation that your minimal background enhances your primary subject but mustadmit that only after Bcoultry mentioned it did I become "aware" of it.
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Old Jun 20, 2004, 2:15 AM   #35
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I'll confess to not ever hearing that phrase Mark. Or brass meaning money.
I was thinking of a far more literal meaning. Horses used to wear brass and where there are horses there's muck. :-)
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Old Jun 20, 2004, 4:19 AM   #36
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I think "Where there's muck there's brass" actually comes from Yorkshire but i don't know how it started. :-)
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Old Jun 20, 2004, 9:50 AM   #37
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digcamfan, i read about a guy who regularly took photos of model cars. He said that he built himself a small box to fit the cars in and lined it with white board and fitted lights to it so that he could shine them onto the cars. I might have a go at something like this sometime just in case i want to take any more photos with a light background. In fact you could get different coloured card to line the box with for different backgrounds. A bit like a mini studio. :-)
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Old Jun 20, 2004, 1:28 PM   #38
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Quote:
built himself a small box
Take three white mat boards, hinge them with strong tape, and you have a folding white screen. You can use cloth in different colors as drapes or lean a thinner piece of paper up against the back and let it curve down and under your subject. The farther back from the subject you place the screen and the shallower your depth of field, the less imposing the background will become. Though it wasn't quite the same setup, my cup and floating cookie were managed by using a black board and a black base. Taping stuff is not only easier than building stuff, but because it folds, it's a lot easier to store.
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Old Jun 20, 2004, 1:36 PM   #39
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Yes, that sounds like a good idea. My wife does scrapbooking and she suggested mountboard which she used to make a scrapbook cover. I noticed you talking about flashlights in another post, they could make for good lighting with a couple of small torches. :-)
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Old Jun 20, 2004, 2:13 PM   #40
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Now you're cooking, Jackrussell!

Another typeof lighting to think about is a 100W halogen desk lamp, the kind with a gooseneckso you can position it precisely. Also, if they're sold in England, look for GE Reveal light bulbs. They have a blue-magenta coating on them that cuts down on the yellow cast of normal incandescent bulbs. And when I get up the energy, I'llbe goingto the local home-improvement store in search of "daylight" fluorescent fixtures, which I'll report on if I find one and actually buy it.
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