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Old Jan 18, 2005, 4:20 AM   #1
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Old Jan 19, 2005, 4:28 AM   #2
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Can you tell us a bit about it please Alan? I'm not seeing it as an abstract myself so maybe some info would help me see it through your eyes.
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Old Jan 19, 2005, 6:12 AM   #3
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ferny wrote:
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Can you tell us a bit about it please Alan? I'm not seeing it as an abstract myself so maybe some info would help me see it through your eyes.
Well, it looks pretty bizarre (and therefore abstract) to me. If you're not seeing it as an abstract, and think it's merely depictive, what do you think it is? Almost all the other entries in this challenge haven't really been 'abstract' artistically, as I understand it. I can quickly tell what they are.

To me the term 'abstract' in art means something you can't quite understand immediately, and when I saw this in real life for the first time I couldn't believe my eyes, so I photographed it.

I'll tell you more when you've replied. Or maybe everyone's doing this every day, so it's obvious, and I haven't noticed?

Keep up your heroic work on the challenge.

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Old Jan 19, 2005, 8:37 AM   #4
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I think "abstract" can be interpreted in many ways. I can't honestly say what I class as abstract on paper. It's just what I see when I see it. That makes sense, right? I think I'd lean towards it meaning shapes, patterns and the photograph being a piece of art in its own right, rather than a photograph of "something" (people, flowers, buildings, etc.).
I also think that it depends on what the photographer saw and what his or her intentions were when taking the picture. Which is why I asked for some info from you.

To me, and possibly only me, your photo doesn't look like an abstract. It looks to me like what it is. Ice in a glass. I'd be tempted to list it under still life rather than abstract. No offence intended there in any way. I can only say what's it my head. If I'm wrong, I'm wrong. I'll learn from it.

If we had enough people I don't think we'd have a problem with debating what is abstract and what isn't for many hours. :lol:
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Old Jan 19, 2005, 2:07 PM   #5
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I agree that some of posts in this category should be classified as still life macro shots, not abstract. Of course everyone has their own idea of abstract. Although I am by no means an expert, I will comment on your shot. I think there may bea pleasing picture in this subjectif more attention was paid to setup and cropping. To me, the stuff around the glass; the placemat and the table distract from the subject. Also if you cropped in on part of the ice instead of the whole glass it would look more abstract.
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Old Jan 20, 2005, 3:15 AM   #6
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DigiK wrote:
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if you cropped in on part of the ice instead of the whole glass it would look more abstract.
I agree with you completely, but I thought (wrongly, it seems) that I was following the model of most of the previous entries for this challenge, which were plainly recognisable objects. If you can't tell where it was taken, what's the point of restricting the challenge to your home?

Hi, ho!
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Old Jan 20, 2005, 3:29 AM   #7
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ferny wrote:
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It looks to me like what it is. Ice in a glass. I'd be tempted to list it under still life rather than abstract.
The container is a water-jacketed mug plastic beer mug, bought as a present for me by my family (from Harrods of all places -I hope they don't make a habit of shopping there).

You leave the mug upside down in the freezer to freeze the jacket to -20C or so, and then add your drink, and it works excellently. Remarkably, I found that if you add pre-refrigerated (5C or so) low-alcohol lager, a cylindrical tubeof ice grows inside the container, rising into the air above and around the drink.

This is the most artistic (nay, abstract) image of the process that I've managed, and I and the family like it a lot. I thought (wrongly, it seems) that I'd included just enough of a clue to show how the 'abstract' design of the ice was achieved. Never mind; we live & learn.

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Old Jan 20, 2005, 8:46 AM   #8
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I'm picking up that you're not very happy Alan. I hope I'm wrong but if I'm not I hope you haven't taken what I've said the wrong way. I'm just trying to find out what was in your head when you took the photo.


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If you can't tell where it was taken, what's the point of restricting the challenge to your home?
We all walk around our home and don't notice how many photo opportunities there are. The main reason for house hold abstracts is to help people realise that anything can make a good photograph.

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The container is a water-jacketed mug plastic beer mug, bought as a present for me by my family (from Harrods of all places - I hope they don't make a habit of shopping there).

You leave the mug upside down in the freezer to freeze the jacket to -20C or so, and then add your drink, and it works excellently. Remarkably, I found that if you add pre-refrigerated (5C or so) low-alcohol lager, a cylindrical tube of ice grows inside the container, rising into the air above and around the drink.
I've got one like that. It's just a cheap Homer Simpson one. It's floating around the cupboard somewhere.

Quote:
This is the most artistic (nay, abstract) image of the process that I've managed, and I and the family like it a lot. I thought (wrongly, it seems) that I'd included just enough of a clue to show how the 'abstract' design of the ice was achieved. Never mind; we live & learn.
I think the biggest problem with me seeing it as an abstract (and I've made me bold to highlight that this is just my view and in essence means very little) is that I can see the handle. Have you played around, cropping out the parts which give the game away, so to speak? Leaving the circles.
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Old Jan 20, 2005, 9:35 AM   #9
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ferny wrote:
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I'm picking up that you're not very happy Alan.
Don't worry about it, Ferny. We're talking art appreciation here, where no-one ever agrees with anything. None of us is Brian Sewell, after all, thankfully.

Regards, Alan T

PS for non-UK readers: Brian Sewell: noted English art critic, prominent in all media, National Treasure, National Joke; only person who can make our Queen sound plebeian and uneducated.
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