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Old Mar 5, 2005, 6:16 PM   #1
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After going through photos from my shoot today, I think this would be considered "found" as well.

I saw this man sitting on a park bench -- it was a beautiful sunny day, but he looked very unhappy.So in addition to being "found," I think there's also an interesting contrast in the mood.

Thoughts?
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Old Mar 7, 2005, 4:03 AM   #2
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I don't like the way she's looking out of the picture. It makes it feel like the entire right side of the photograph is wasted space. If she was on the right herself and looking into the photograph you would be looking at her (on the right) and then flowing her eyes (which means to the left so the entire photo gets looked at).

I like the colours, tone and feel of the photograph.
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Old Mar 7, 2005, 4:56 PM   #3
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Every once in a great while, I get a chance to pop in here to see what the folks are up to. I do this, then get back to work, but your comment, Ferny, bothered me because it isn't always true that things should be going into, not out of, the picture, nor is it always true that a person should be looking into the picture. It's all very dependent on what's being "said" by the photograph.

I like the photo's composition and I think the trees and the bench on the right anchor the eyes, in particular, the unoccupied bench because it attracts attention.

Somewhere and a long time ago, I saw a photograph where the subject had almost completely walked out of the picture. It was stunning and certainly evocative of the feeling one gets when watching someone leave.

Good job, Smilez03. The only flaw I find may actually be a result of JPEG compression. The colors seem a bit over-saturated.

--Barbara
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Old Mar 7, 2005, 5:42 PM   #4
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Barbara!!!!
Nice to hear from you. I havn't seen you in a while. How's it going?


Smilez03, I like the picture. Great colors and mood.



Brad
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Old Mar 7, 2005, 6:33 PM   #5
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Going fairly well, Brad. Thanks for asking. I've turned into a workaholic and may have to shoot myself.

--Barbara
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Old Mar 7, 2005, 11:59 PM   #6
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heyy!! barbara! great to see you pop in!

lol, don't go shooting yourself...just take a couple days off to relax!

i agree about the guy not facing into the photo...usually it's a bad thing...buuut, i think it works well here!

interesting contrast, in the happy-looking sun, and the depressed-looking man!

i like it

Vito
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Old Mar 8, 2005, 1:19 AM   #7
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Thanks vito. It was so hard, I didn't want to disrespect the man by making it blatently obvious I was photographing him so I kind of had to walk past, do a quick turn around and snap.
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Old Mar 8, 2005, 3:34 AM   #8
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bcoultry wrote:
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Every once in a great while, I get a chance to pop in here to see what the folks are up to. I do this, then get back to work, but your comment, Ferny, bothered me because it isn't always true that things should be going into, not out of, the picture, nor is it always true that a person should be looking into the picture. It's all very dependent on what's being "said" by the photograph.

I like the photo's composition and I think the trees and the bench on the right anchor the eyes, in particular, the unoccupied bench because it attracts attention.

Somewhere and a long time ago, I saw a photograph where the subject had almost completely walked out of the picture. It was stunning and certainly evocative of the feeling one gets when watching someone leave.

Good job, Smilez03. The only flaw I find may actually be a result of JPEG compression. The colors seem a bit over-saturated.

--Barbara
Why would it bother you? It's no different to what I said in tleonhar's wall flower thread. I'm just giving my view. These things are called photographic rules and that name is misleading. They should be called guidlines instead. They're there to help us with composition but there are lots of times when they should be ignored. I don't feel this is one of those. That is just my view.

I hope smile doesn't mind, but I'm going to try and explain myself better. When I look at this photograph this is what I see. I completely ignore the right side of the photograph and I focus on the person. So, to me, the right side is wasted space.
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Old Mar 8, 2005, 3:38 AM   #9
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This is rather crude but I'm just trying to explain myself. It isn't meant to represent the photograph that could have been taken. All I've done is flip the person round. Now for me, that improves the photograph. Now I'm looking at the person and the rest of the photograph. I'm being led into the rest.

Once again I'd like to emphasize that this is just my person opinion. So I don't want anyone to get offended. I'm not saying this is a bad photograph or that I don't like it. Far from it. I'm just offering up what came into my head when I viewed it.
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Old Mar 8, 2005, 10:23 AM   #10
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Great, Ferny! You did just what I was hoping you or someone else would do. I read a quote from a physicist recently about the only law in the universebeing that there is no law.

You proceeded to explain your reasoning behind your critique so everyone could understand how you were seeing the photograph. This is important since a photograph has, in a sense, two creators: the photographer and the person viewing the photograph. None of us can help but bring some of ourselves into what we see.

Your rendition of the picture shows your thoughts, which focus on the person himself; my notion of the picture has the person as a more abstract idea of isolation, which requires the composition to remain pretty much as is. Are you right? Am I? Yes.

--Barbara

P.S. Hi, Vito!
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