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Old Jun 6, 2005, 3:47 AM   #11
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photosbyvito wrote:
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...WB can be chosen just by personal taste...i love warm colors..so would probably go with the 7500
Colour balance variations like Barb's series need to be viewed in standardised conditions, really.

Most of us will be viewing the images on a computer monitor, which has its own colour temp adjustment, best left on a standard, reproducible setting. Our perceptions of any given colour will depend upon that and ALSO on the ambient light around the monitor. In a dark room, your brain will perform its own colour balance, and is easily fooled. There's a hands-on science exhibition near here which fools you into seeing a yellow patch as brown, according to the colour patches present or absent around it.

I have a small window near my monitor, letting in daylight. To try & achieve consistency with that, I have the room lit with 'craft working' blue lightbulbs, meant for seamstresses sewing tapestries, and sometimes a dim 'daylight' compact fluorescent.

I'm finding all this fascinating, because my 'new' second-hand camcorder has a colour rendering not to our taste, and I'm going to have to fiddle with it.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 5:59 PM   #12
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ELC wrote:
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Great example of how you placed the WB diagram with the corresponding degrees... I would say that the 5500 setting would work for me. :-)
After reading what Alan had to say about images on monitors, I realize that, though on my monitor, 5500 is far too warm, it could well be that your monitor is set to cooler tones.

You're right, Alan, about all the different slide films. It was nice to have the choice, but it was also downright confusing. I'm so much happier with digital.

B.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 10:44 PM   #13
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wwaiiiit a minute...

doesn't light get bluer as it gets hotter?

lol

i'm confused..

vito
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 12:58 AM   #14
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Vito;

Yes, the light shifts from red to blue with increasing temperature, but look again at Barbara's series. The resulting image goes from blue towards red. and that is what we are referring to when we call colors warm or cool. Confusing, ain't it?

brian
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 5:25 AM   #15
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Vito,

When the camera gets it wrong, accidentally or by design as in this challenge, it does it in apparently the wrong direction. See Barb's post...bcoultry wrote:
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....as Cal said, the setting on the camera is used to counter the specific colors of light. So, for instance,a low temperature setting on the camerais referring to the low temperature ofthe tungsten light glowing in the living room, not to the temperature being applied by the camera. The camera is actually choosing a high-temperature blue.
"Counter" is the relevant word. It's the wrong way round.

Do a series yourself and see how it's upside down! A good experiment to do as well would be at night by fluorescent light, or by sodium vapour orange street lighting. That light is nothing like anything found naturally, and has huge peaks at particular wavelengths. I'd do it myself, but I have plenty of trouble staying awake in the day, let alone at night.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 9:02 AM   #16
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Vito, the unfortunate thing is that art and reality seem to take opposite stands. In art, the "warm" colors are red, orange, and yellow with red being considered the warmest. The designation of "warm" comes from the association with fire. There's also the fact that the human eye more quickly detects warm colors, and so these huesseem to visually advance toward us. The "cool" colors, all of them having at least some blue in them, are associated with ice and water, and because we don't detect these colors as quickly as we do the warm ones, they seem to visually retreat.

So much for art. In the real world where fire turns hard stuff into liquids, the warmer something gets, the closer to white it glows, and on the way to white, it goes from red to yellow to blue and then on to white. Any metalsmith will confirm this. Probably any astronomer willtoo, since yellow stars such as our sun aren't burning as hotly as blue stars.

Since photography deals with light until it comes time to print, we camera bugs need to think about fire. Red is cooler, blue is a lot hotter. When we print, we have to think about the exact reverse because now we're dealing with perception where red is like a leaping fire and blue is like a distant mountain.

Everything would have been fine if artists had chosen words other than hot and cold to describe color.:sad:

--Barbara
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 10:41 AM   #17
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bcoultry wrote:
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Everything would have been fine if artists had chosen words other than hot and cold to describe color.
Gosh, Barb, you're a poet as well as a photographer. Keep up the good work.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 11:14 AM   #18
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Alan T wrote:
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Gosh, Barb, you're a poet as well as a photographer. Keep up the good work.
Eloquence is entirely dependent on the level of caffeine in one's system.

B.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 1:37 PM   #19
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So, in the context of WB, just remember, if you want to warm up the colors in your picture, you set the color temperature higher.

brian
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 3:29 PM   #20
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Brian, you're exactly right, but it does somehow go against the grain, doesn't it? I'll bet this is why most of the cameras come with settings like "indoors," "cloudy," "fluorescent," etc. How much easier it must be to look at a scene, know what kind of light it has, and then set the camera appropriately.

--Barbara
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