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Old Jul 20, 2005, 2:18 AM   #1
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For a while I thought it was my camera's lens that made the lamp posts look so skew, then I realised we have a lot of bad drivers around here.
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Old Jul 20, 2005, 2:23 AM   #2
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While I like the darker one most, its a bit too soft, espcially the McDonalds sign.

These images are 100% out of camera, no levels, no cropping, no denoising. While they can certainly benefit from some post processing, I have no idea where to begin. Especially with the cropping.
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Old Jul 20, 2005, 10:02 AM   #3
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First of all, you need to reduce the size of the images for posting. Try to make your largest dimension about 700-800 pixels or less.

Both images are fuzzy. You need to use manual focus on night scenes as auto-focus will not perform well.

The second picture is about two f-stops overexposed. As a result, it is too light and it shows too much detail of the street and other things that you probably don't want in the picture. I think the first picture is slightly overexposed but not much.

When shooting long exposures like this at night, you need a small aperture opening (high f-stop number). Otherwise long exposures will result in overexposing the image. I recommend f16 for 30 seconds as a start. Since there are a lot of bright light sources in this scene, f22 might be better. If it were a static scene (no moving lights) I would stay with f16 and shorten the exposure to 15 seconds.

If you shot in automatic, you are at the mercy of the camera cpu and night exposures will be too light without some negative compensation.

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Old Jul 20, 2005, 10:16 AM   #4
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Thanks for the advice.

As I am looking to capture the whole scene, should I focus on infinity? Obviously it should be shot at the widest angle possible. The camera (S2 IS) has a max f-stop of 8.

I understand that for each f-number increase, the shutter speed doubles, right?

So 15/8 = 1.9s shutter speed?

I probably should not have posted my first tries with the new camera, although I thought they were allright. Looks like I still have some way to go before I can accurately judge the softness of an image.

Sorry about the image size, and for asking the questions here, I know this is not what this forum is for.

Thanks again for the honest criticism.
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Old Jul 20, 2005, 10:25 AM   #5
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In answer to your question about changing f-stop vs shutter speed, your presumption is correct only if shooting in auto. In manual, changing the f-stop will have no effect on shutter speed.

Regarding asking questions, that is why this forum exists. We try to make the challenges educational so that you can learn from them and understand your mistakes. The only dumb question is the one not asked.

Regarding focus, I would recommend focusing on something moderately close like one of the lamp posts or the McDonalds sign. If you focus on infinity, most likely everything in the foreground will be fuzzy.

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Old Jul 20, 2005, 10:32 AM   #6
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I asked the f-stop number vs shutter speed in response to your suggestion. I think I should have made it a bit clearer.

You suggested f16 with 15s shutter speed.

The difference between your suggested f-number and the S2's max f-number is 8, so to get the same exposure as the one you suggested, I would have to devide the difference by 15, to get the shutterspeed for the larger apperature.


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Old Jul 20, 2005, 10:42 AM   #7
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OK, yes I was confused by your original statement. You are correct. 30 seconds at f16 would be equivalent to 15 seconds at f8. The difference being that the light streaks from moving vehicles won't be as long. For a static scene, it won't make any difference.

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