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Old Dec 31, 2006, 5:50 PM   #1
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I just like the symetry and the look of these thistles.
Here's wishing everyone a Happy New Year,
Steve






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Old Jan 1, 2007, 9:21 AM   #2
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I love your single thistle! Lots of 3-D texture. A single subject like this has impact. Donna
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Old Jan 1, 2007, 3:19 PM   #3
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just a bit of trivia for u mate regarding "teasels"

the valley where i live was heavily into wollen production and teasels where used in the process, it was something to do with the barbs

found this what explains it better than i could

FOR MANY CENTURIES the dried seed-head of the Fullers' Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum), which figures prominently in the coat of arms of The Clothworkers' Company, has been used to bring up a lustrous polished nap or pile on certain cloths prior to the final finishing process. Several efforts have been made to develop a synthetic teasel or some other alternative to the natural product, but these have met with little success. The teasel raising machine, or ‘gig', has been generally replaced by the card wire raising machine, giving higher output, based on rather different principles, and the kind of machine on which most raised fabrics are made today. However, the action of the finest wire brushes is too severe for some cloths with a particularly high quality finish, so, for their makers, Dipsacus fullonum reigns supreme.
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Old Jan 2, 2007, 11:06 AM   #4
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Thanks for the information. I remember reading somewhere that they were grown commercially in England and used to nap wool and well as other fabrics. Interesting trivia, I just like the way it looks in a photograph. They seem to be all over the place here in the marsh land parts of the Central Valley in Northern California.
Thanks again,
Steve
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Old Jan 7, 2007, 2:39 AM   #5
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Hi

I am familiar with teasels ...I was photoing some in Bognor Regis this summer.

These are very nice .... crisp and three dimensional.

Best wishes

Glyn
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Old Jan 17, 2007, 10:51 PM   #6
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i like the 2nd the best. That thing looks mean.
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