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Old Apr 6, 2008, 11:28 AM   #1
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I was out taking wildflower photos yesterday and happened to see this lonely Lupin lacking any color at all. An interesting genetic variation, I thought.

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Old Apr 6, 2008, 12:45 PM   #2
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Hi smac - I have run across this several times in the mountains here in Washington State. Like you, I will be in an area with lots of blue Lupine and will find a bush of pure white ones like you did. When I compare the size and leaves of the two, they are the same.

I'm sure botanist have a term for this, because I have seen this happen in other wildflowers also. Yesterday I found a pure white Grass Widow plant. They are normally purple, so it does happen, although rarely- Bruce


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Old Apr 6, 2008, 1:27 PM   #3
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Seed companies look for variants like this to sell as new ornamental varieties. Technically it would just be a white variant, not an albino, as albinism is a total absence of pigmant, and this plant has normal coloration elsewhere than the petals.

Nice picture and a nice find.
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Old Apr 6, 2008, 4:12 PM   #4
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The question I have is will the seeds this Lupine produces make more white Lupine or do they make blue lupine? You would think if they make white Lupine, then you would see several plants in the same area, the off-spring of the original parent. Maybe somebody knows how this works.

I guess I'm not sure in my mind if a white flowered plant will produce more white flowered plants. On the other hand, if they are a true albino, you would think the leaves and stems would be lighter colored also - Bruce
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Old Apr 6, 2008, 7:10 PM   #5
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bper wrote:
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The question I have is will the seeds this Lupine produces make more white Lupine or do they make blue lupine? You would think if they make white Lupine, then you would see several plants in the same area, the off-spring of the original parent. Maybe somebody knows how this works.

I guess I'm not sure in my mind if a white flowered plant will produce more white flowered plants. On the other hand, if they are a true albino, you would think the leaves and stems would be lighter colored also - Bruce
The only way to know for sure is to collect some seeds and plant them, and you might then have to cross fertilize a second generation to get a repeat. If this were a tree or perennial shrub it could be propagated by cuttings, but I doubt that would work with lupines. the Gordon Apple in my yard was a "sport" - bearing fruit (in acoastal zone where apples normally do not fruit) on a single branch, from which the variety was propagated by cuttings.
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Old Apr 7, 2008, 2:52 PM   #6
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penolta wrote:
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bper wrote:
Quote:
The question I have is will the seeds this Lupine produces make more white Lupine or do they make blue lupine? You would think if they make white Lupine, then you would see several plants in the same area, the off-spring of the original parent. Maybe somebody knows how this works.

I guess I'm not sure in my mind if a white flowered plant will produce more white flowered plants. On the other hand, if they are a true albino, you would think the leaves and stems would be lighter colored also - Bruce
The only way to know for sure is to collect some seeds and plant them, and you might then have to cross fertilize a second generation to get a repeat. If this were a tree or perennial shrub it could be propagated by cuttings, but I doubt that would work with lupines. the Gordon Apple in my yard was a "sport" - bearing fruit (in acoastal zone where apples normally do not fruit) on a single branch, from which the variety was propagated by cuttings.
I agree that controlling the pollenation process is probably the way to tell. I was doing a little more reading about the flowers (Lupin) in this area and found that the white variety does show up now and again. There was even mention of a pale pink variety. Genetic variations for sure. Random and spontaneous mutations to the DNA base pairs that produce these rather unique and rare flowers. Cool stuff, thanks for the discussion.

Cheers guys,
Steve
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