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Old Jun 9, 2005, 12:09 AM   #1
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IMAGE REMOVED..sorry.

Hi :bye:

Been trying out a diopter for macro. I'm not sure how I like it yet. Seems to be a very fine line between sharpness and blur. Has anyone else used a diopter?



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Old Jun 9, 2005, 11:24 AM   #2
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Hi, love the picture, im new to photography, and have been trying my hand, with a 105mm sigma.



I was just wondering what a diopter was? cause it obviously works



Cheers
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Old Jun 9, 2005, 4:17 PM   #3
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A diopter is a second lens, goes on like a filter than works like a magnifying glass, not the same as a macro lens even though the end result is the same.

Just got a set yesterday, this is an excellent shot, what type camera do you use and what size diopter?



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Old Jun 10, 2005, 11:02 AM   #4
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londonting2 wrote:
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Hi, love the picture, im new to photography, and have been trying my hand, with a 105mm sigma.



I was just wondering what a diopter was? cause it obviously works



Cheers

Hi there,

Thanks a bunch! A diopter is a handy gadget that screws onto an existing lens which enables you to get closer to your subject than you normally can with your lens. It's kinda fun to work with! :-)
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Old Jun 10, 2005, 11:05 AM   #5
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randy o wrote:
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A diopter is a second lens, goes on like a filter than works like a magnifying glass, not the same as a macro lens even though the end result is the same.

Just got a set yesterday, this is an excellent shot, what type camera do you use and what size diopter?



Randy O


Hi Randy,

Thanks! I used a Canon digital Rebel (300D) and the diopter I used was a 500D for 70-300mm lenses. Have fun with your new set! :-)
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Old Jun 10, 2005, 12:38 PM   #6
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Nice shot - I love the composition and the color but find it lacking a bit in sharpness / detail. If it cant be sharper, I dunno, I may have gone the other way and blurred it a smidge more in pp. Just a thought and my two pence worth :-)
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Old Jun 10, 2005, 1:39 PM   #7
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The issue you describe when using a "diopter" (often also called a close-up lens - the term "diopter" actually refers to the magnifying power of a lens, not the lens itself) is likely related to depth of field.When using an add-on lens of this type, the depth of field (DOF) becomes very shallow - sometimes only a few milllimeters with the stronger lenses - and only a small movement of the camera or subject can throw the entire thing out of focus. The best way to alleviate this problem is to use the smallest aperture you can for the light you have (a tripod is a huge help in close-up photography), which will give you the maximum DOF and keep as much of the image as possible in focus. It's also best if you avoid inexpensive single-element close-up lenses, as they tend to lose focus toward the edges.

I use a Nikon 6T close-up lens (rated at 2.9 diopter) on my Panasonic FZ20, and I find this lens offers very good sharpness and clarity even at the periphery of the lens. I get the best results using the smallest aperture, and a tripod or at least a monopod to eliminate movement, even in bright light. it also offers good mix of magnification and DOF, where a stronger lens might yield a larger image, but with poorer DOF. A weaker lens - say, 1.5 diopter - would offer greater DOF, but less magnification, and wouldn't be as suitable for true macro photography.
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Old Jun 11, 2005, 11:14 AM   #8
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thanks, for the input,i may have to purchase myself one. Is only money after all, lol
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Old Jun 12, 2005, 2:51 AM   #9
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suze wrote:
Quote:
Nice shot - I love the composition and the color but find it lacking a bit in sharpness / detail. If it cant be sharper, I dunno, I may have gone the other way and blurred it a smidge more in pp. Just a thought and my two pence worth :-)
Hi Suze!

That's an awesome idea...I'll give it a whirl and see how it looks. Thanks so much! :-)
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Old Jun 12, 2005, 2:59 AM   #10
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squirl033 wrote:
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The issue you describe when using a "diopter" (often also called a close-up lens - the term "diopter" actually refers to the magnifying power of a lens, not the lens itself) is ....................

Hi...yes, you describe it exactly the way I'm experiencing this diopter. I believe you're right about using the smallest aperturepossible to get the best results. I'm still experimenting:|....but I'm having a lot of fun with it! Thanks very much for the info you've provided!
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