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Old Jan 12, 2010, 3:55 PM   #91
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No problem. Windows 7 is actually better than most previous releases in a number of ways.

You'd be surprised at how easy newer linux distros are to use though. I've been very impressed at how little time I have to spend with helping out my wife with computer problems anymore since switching her to it (because Linux is just so much easier for her to use compared to Windows, as she's not that "computer savvy").

I still keep Windows on my PCs. Again, it's pretty easy to install both in a dual boot config. That way, you can boot into either operating system as desired.

Let me know if you want to try it at some point, and I can give you simple instructions on how to partition the drives to make room for it, via a nice GUI based partition manager already included in most Linux distros. Compared to installing Windows, installing many Linux distros is very simple (and that's an understatement). I dread reinstalling Windows it's so time consuming. I can usually install and setup a new Linux distro inside of 15 minutes on a fast PC (and very little of that part is actually doing anything versus waiting on everything to copy from CD). ;-)
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 3:58 PM   #92
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We are blessed.

Finally we have 2.8 mature desktop operating systems.

Mac OSX 10.6, Windows 7 and 0.8 for the various linux systems.

I use Windows and Linux at work all day and we run Macs at home. Macs are expensive but very good. Windows 7 is excellent.

Linux - well I'd never use one at home or for fun. Linux is now fine for basic computing and it's fine for servers, but it's not fine for mid-range desktop stuff. The apps just aren't there.

I love open source, I think it's great. But GIMP is not PS. None of the Linux video editing apps really compare to Final Cut Pro or the Adobe products. One day they will catch up, but for now doing that sort of thing requires a great deal of Linux expertise. If you try hard and have great technical expertise most things are possible with Linux, but possible is not easy, and not fun for most people.

I would never use Linux at home because unless it's very simple stuff it's just too much effort. When I'm at home I have zero interest in the operating system, all I want it to do is get out of my way and let me run the applications I'm interested in. OSX and W7 do that, Linux would, but it doesn't have the apps I want.

The irony is that just as Mac and Windows and Linux are finally maturing as desktop systems we are about to start shifting all our processing and storage into the cloud, accessing it all from mobile devices.
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 4:07 PM   #93
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Aaah... You're probably just too accustomed to Adobe products. ;-)

For video editing, give Kdenlive a try. For image management and many editing tasks, look at the new 1.0.0 release of digiKam (more than most users will need, as not everyone needs Photoshop; with loads of slick features, plugins and and image management tools), or apps like the new Bibble Pro 5 for raw conversion needs. A great number of non-Adobe windows apps run fine in Linux under Wine, too (as well as most versions of Photoshop prior to CS4, if you really must have Photoshop). ;-)

As for too much effort... experiment with some of the newer distros. They've matured a lot over the past couple of years. You can't judge one by another (as Linux is only the underlying kernel, not your desktop, configuration tools, software installed, software management tools, etc.) For example, give Linux Mint 8 a try. It's hard to beat for ease of use and ease of software installation (and it already has most codecs and plugins you'd need to use without jumping through hoops to install them). Or, if you must have Windows for some applications, install it in a virtual machine under Linux using the free Sun VirtualBox
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 4:26 PM   #94
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P.S.

Frankly, I have *far* more trouble with Windows than I do with Linux on my PCs (and that's an understatement). I have problems with it on a frequent basis, requiring serious troubleshooting or reinstallation when updates cause issues, malware gets through despite my best efforts to avoid it, etc. ;-)

If I didn't absolutely have to use it to get access to some manufacturers' software from time to time, I wouldn't bother to leave it installed on my PCs.

I'm very glad my wife doesn't need anything Windows specific. as I've saved a *lot* of time over the past few years since switching her to Linux (whereas it used to be a constant hassle with problems she'd run into). Linux "just works", without those kinds of hassles (at least if you're using the right distros).
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 2:20 AM   #95
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I've been using Linux (daily) alongside various other Unix and Windows since around 1995 when you had to compile the kernel during an installation. I also use current distros, they are very easy to install, and the things they do they do very well. But there is much that they cannot do.

I haven't had any problems with professionally installed and maintained Windows systems since Windows 2000. And people who complain that they have - well it doesn't inspire a great deal of confidence in their abilities to be honest.

I do use the modern distros. They are now more than good enough for many computing needs. Web browsing, document creation, etc. But the commercial apps are very limited and open source lags behind the commercial offerings by many years.

If you think that Kdenlive is even in the same ballpark as Adobe Premier, let alone Final Cut Pro or Avid Media Composer, then you simply don't understand the problem space.

Digikam looks great, better than many applications in common use - in fact it looks like it's now better than iPhoto, Picassa, etc.

Quote:
They've matured a lot over the past couple of years. You can't judge one by another (as Linux is only the underlying kernel, not your desktop, configuration tools, software installed, software management tools, etc.)
Wrong. That is exactly the problem with Linux. No need to worry about all that nonsense with Windows or Mac.

Noob: "I tried Linux and had all these problems..(follows a long list).."
Linux expert: "Yes but you were using the wrong distro, and those are the wrong tools, have you tried...(follows a long incomprehensible list).."
Noob: "Yeah whatever." I would rather pay Apple or Microsoft to sort all that out for me.
Linux expert: "You idiot. Micro$oft is ripping you off. Apple is too expensive. Linux is the best because blah blah blah. Open source is the best because blah blah blah." Noob runs off to buy his computer (with operating system and cool applications) in a shop.

Thus will it always be.
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 4:16 AM   #96
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digiKam is very nice. That's one of my points. Photography related applications are coming along quite nicely now. ;-)

The same thing with Linux. People tend to stereotype it, because they found one distro too hard to use, or didn't like the desktop, apps, etc. Linux is only the underlying kernel.

You've got lots of nice applications available for Linux, including OfficeOffice.org, Firefox, music managers, photography related applications and much more.

As for Windows, I've got problems on more than one machine right now because of Microsoft Updates. I wasted an entire afternoon trying to get a Vista Service Pack installed on my Wife's laptop not long ago, trying multiple times because it refused to complete the installation (backing out changes when it couldn't complete). I tried removing virus protection products, the firewall, etc. trying find find some kind of conflict that might be causing it (which would be unusual, since we rarely use Windows on it, and she never uses it at all). It refused to install. I'll probably try downloading it and burning it to CD and trying it that way (since the automatic updates won't install it). I've got the same problem on another PC with XP Pro on it (won't install the latest service pack). Chances are, I'll just reinstall it from scratch and try it that way (which is a huge chore with all of the reboots installing updates when reinstalling windows from scratch).

Unfortunately, I also get tasked to fix my relatives PCs because they get so virus and spyware infested, despite the use of fully updated products designed to protect against that kind of thing. Anymore, I'm starting to install Linux on them to use instead, since they have applications available for everything they'd normally do that way (web browsing, office apps, etc.).
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 5:50 AM   #97
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P.S.

The other trend I'm seeing is more and more commercial providers jumping on board the Linux bandwagon. For example, you mentioned Picasa. It's been available for ages for Linux (long before they offered a Mac version of it). Ditto for Google Desktop and Gadgets, etc. The same thing applies to Adobe Flash Player. It's available for Linux (and they even have a pre-release you can download to get a 64 bit version for Linux, whereas you have to run a 32 bit version of it in Windows, since they don't offer a 64 bit version of it for other operating systems yet). You've also got Adobe Acrobat Reader for Linux, Realplayer for Linux and more.

Got a new Nvidia video card? Nvidia updates it's accelerated drivers for Linux on a regular basis (as does ATI). New Printer? HP is a strong supporter of Linux via it's HPLIP toolkit so you can do the same things you can in Windows (scan if you have a multi-function device, align print heads, check ink levels, manage print jobs, etc.). I've seen HP printers supported in Linux that are not supported in Windows 7 (and the same thing applies to some of the Epson printers around). Ditto for Intel (they have Linux drivers available for their chipsets, as do many other manufacturers now. Have a wireless chipset that doesn't have a native linux driver (and many do), no problem. You can still use your Windows drivers in Linux via ndiswrapper. I'm typing from Firefox running in Linux right now with a wireless connection using a Netgear wireless adapter with the Windows drivers included on the CD with it. It works just fine that way.

I've also been surprised at how many Windows applications run just fine in the latest beta versions of Wine, if you absolutely must use a Windows app for something. For example, I use PhotoME in Linux under Wine to check EXIF and maker notes info from user posted images on a regular basis.

You can also install Windows in a Virtual Machine under Linux if you want to use both without needing to reboot into one or the other.

I've been considering doing that myself (buying a copy of Win 7 and installing it in Virtual Box under Linux). That way, I can keep up with the latest versions of camera manufacturers' software (Capture NX2, etc.) without needing to reboot. That's about the only reason I bother to keep Windows on my PCs at all (to try out new versions of camera manufacturer's software), as available applications for Linux (or applications that run fine in Wine) meet my other computing needs.
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 10:54 AM   #98
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Today I installed the Windows 7 Pro 64. It took sometime but went smooth. But curiously when installing the Gforce driver it doesn't recognize it as a 64 bits wiin7 n be happening here? Is there a way to check if it's a 64 bits Windows7?
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 10:55 AM   #99
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as a side-note since we are talking open source and linux.

i have been using the go open office suite for a while on my home computer and must say i really like it. the interface is improved over open office and does everything i need well.
http://go-oo.org/
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 11:19 AM   #100
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Yep. The Go-oo version is the one you want to use with Windows (as it's got more features with better compatibility with MS Office files compared to the standard OpenOffice.org version). My wife uses it all the time when doing work in off hours at home, with no issues sharing files with her work PC and co-workers (using MS Office).

The Go-oo version is the one you'll usually find in the software repositories for popular Linux distros, too.
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