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Old Jan 10, 2010, 8:58 AM   #81
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BTW, one more thing you may want to be aware of, is that there are a number of Linux distros that are geared towards Audio Professionals, with specialized real time kernel patches for lower latency, as well as a number of software tools included that are specific to Audio.

I don't know much about that kind of thing. But, from what I understand, Ardour is considered to be one of the better ones available. You can see more about it here:

http://ardour.org/

Audacity (which it's sounds like you're already using) is also available for Linux.

One distribution that's geared towards users wanting to use those types of tools is Ubuntu Studio (includes real time kernel patches for low latency audio, and comes with software like Ardour preinstalled). You'll also find thousands of other software packages available in the Ubuntu repositories than you can install with a mouse click or two.

http://ubuntustudio.org/

There are a number of other distributions that are geared for that kind of thing, too. You'll see a few of them listed on this page:

http://lau.linuxaudio.org/

So, if that kind of thing is important to you, you may want to try a few of them. If you like one, you can easily setup your PC in a dual boot config (so you can boot into one of them as desired, or select Windows from your boot menu instead).

You'll also find some nice open source tools for Video editing that are easy to install in most Linux distros. For example, Kdenlive is popular tool for that purpose:

http://www.kdenlive.org/
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Old Jan 10, 2010, 9:55 AM   #82
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P.S.

Yet one more open source software package geared towards audio that you may want to take a look at is LMMS (Linux MultiMedia Studio). It's in the repositories for a number of linux distros. For example, I noticed it as a "one click" install when browing through some of the packages available for Linux Mint 8 (a linux distribution I have installed on my wife's laptop, along with Vista and SimplyMEPIS 8.5 Beta 3).

http://lmms.sourceforge.net/home.php

If you look on the screen shots page, you'll also see a video demo of it on YouTube.

BTW, Linux Mint is a very easy to use distro if you want to try it. It's great for Linux newbies since it has lots of preinstalled browser plugins and codecs, with it's own software repository, in addition to being able to use any of the software available for Ubuntu 9.10. It also has Audicity, Arduour, digiKam, Gimp and much more in it's software repositories. I like it's menu system setup better than most linux distros. Here's a review of it:

http://danlynch.org/blog/2009/12/mint8/

Again, these are free, and it's really pretty simple to set one up in a dual boot configuration with Windows (and you can read and write to NTFS partitions, so you can share the same files, regardless of the operating system you decide to boot into).

P.S.

It also looks like LMMS is available for Windows (I see precompiled binaries for Windows available on the download pages).
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Old Jan 10, 2010, 10:36 AM   #83
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It's like I need an intro on Linux. Do you know a good site to get introduced in this world (with tutorials would be better)?
Besides audio software, an audio interface (PCI card too me) is needed to record to hard disks.
Without aspiring to top audio cards (quite expensive) something like this should be a good one to begin:

M-Audio Delta 1010LT

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Old Jan 10, 2010, 10:58 AM   #84
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I just did a quick google search, and it looks like that card is supported in Linux (at least from what I could tell from some forum posts about it from users of 64 Studio (which is a popular Linux distro for Audio content creation). That is one thing you want to watch out for with specialized cards (make sure drivers are available for Linux). A *lot* of hardware is supported by newer Linux kernels (often hardware that isn't even supported by Vista or Windows 7). But, it's a good idea to check for anything like that.

I did see one post from someone saying they preferred to use something other than the default Gnome audio settings to handle levels with it, saying they installed alsa-tools-gui, which includes the envy24control. But, you should be able to install something like that with a mouse click or two using Synaptic (which is a software package manager found in many linux distributions, allowing you to search for software you're interested in, and check a box to mark it for installation, letting the package manager download and install it for you).

As for tutorials, most popular linux distributions have a Wiki setup, as well as user guides. Community support is also very good with many Linux distributions via their Forums. For example, here's a Wiki page you'll find for Mint with links to resources:

http://linuxmint.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Again, my suggestion would be to try it and see what you think. There are pros and cons to any operating system (and with Linux, you've got many distributions to choose from, with a variety of differences between them, since Linux is only the underlying kernel, not what you see when you use it for the deskstop, or the software installed in it, or how it's configured and tools available to help with that part, etc.). IOW, you really can't judge one by how you like another. Mint 8 would probably be a good one to try first, as it's very simple to install and use (i.e., if you can use Windows, you should have no problem using Mint 8).
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Old Jan 10, 2010, 11:33 AM   #85
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Here's a link to a .pdf user guide for the latest version of it (Linux Mint 8, a.k.a., Helena):

http://ftp.heanet.ie/pub/linuxmint.c...de/english.pdf

But, again, it's very easy to use (the menu layout is pretty much self explanatory). ;-)
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Old Jan 11, 2010, 8:13 AM   #86
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I will install an internal multiple card reader. Recommendations? Something I should know about?
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Old Jan 11, 2010, 8:33 AM   #87
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Any USB 2.0 attached internal card reader should work (most just attach to one of the existing USB ports on the motherboard), since these are USB Mass Storage Compliant and don't need special drivers.

The main difference between them is size (i.e, are they designed to use a 3.5" drive slot with an adapter if you're using them in a 5.25" bay normally used for a CD/DVD drive; or do they come as a 5.25" drive size), and build quality, assuming you're buying one that supports your card types (and I'd make sure it specifically supports SDHC cards if you use that type, as some readers support Secure Digital but not SDHC).

There are a couple of SATA attached internal readers available. But, I'd probably avoid those as they're not really designed to support Safely Remove or Eject Functions. IOW, in contrast to an external eSATA attached drive, the design of the ones I've seen were not allowing them to be "hot swappable" (meaning that you can't easily remove and insert a card using them without jumping through hoops, as they're designed more for leaving a card in them in place of a disk drive, versus using them as a normal card reader). I've seen that problem reported by users that decided to try one to see if they're faster (regretting that they went that route).

Now, USB 3.0 readers should start hitting store shelves very soon. They're dramatically faster than USB 2.0 readers (USB 3.0 "Superspeed" allows transfer rates of up to 4.8Gbps, which is roughly 10 times as fast as USB 2.0). But, of course, your speed is going to be limited to the speed of the card, and no cards are going to take advantage of that much speed anyway right now. You'd also need a USB 3.0 port to take advantage of USB 3.0 devices (as your motherboard doesn't have USB 3.0). There are some USB 3.0 PCIe cards hitting store shelves now for around $49 (they're using an NEC USB 3.0 chipset that includes drivers for Windows). Support for USB 3.0 is already built into newer Linux kernels (and has been for a while now, thanks to work from developers using the NEC chipset as a development tool)

USB 3.0 may be something to look at in the future. But, for now, I'd probably just get a generic USB 2.0 attached internal reader instead.

There are many available on the market. For example, here are some listings at newegg.com in the U.S. You may want to browse through user reviews to see what people thought of different brands and models.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...&name=Internal
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Old Jan 11, 2010, 11:56 AM   #88
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I got it. it includes an adapter 5.25 3.5 It reads everything imaginable:



Cost: U$ 22.
Thanks again Jim. I own you a thousand or so.
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Old Jan 11, 2010, 12:12 PM   #89
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That looks like a good bet, as long as build quality is OK (and I don't know anything about that one) You have to be careful with the CF slot on some of them (as I've seen a bit of play sometimes in cheaper readers allowing the card to wobble enough on the slots in them to bend one of the pins at the bottom if you don't push it in just right). lol

I threw away a cheap usb attached reader not long ago because I bent a pin in it. That's probably not the norm (but, it was a *very* cheap reader). No biggy, I'll just buy another one. LOL
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 3:40 PM   #90
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I chickened Jim. I've been reading a lot these days. Too much to learn about Linux. Hard learning curve for a guy my age. Also, too many friends with Windows sotfware to share. Legal, of course.
Resuming: I bought an OEM Windows 7 Pro 64 bits.
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