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Old Apr 15, 2010, 11:39 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by JimC View Post
For critical photo work, if budget permits, you'll want to go with something other a TN panel type (and TN is the panel type most LCD monitors use).

For example, go with a display using an IPS panel instead. Better panel types won't have as much in way of viewing angle issues like you'd have with a TN type display either.

In terms of suitability for image editing, these panel types are usually best to worst (and you'll find newer variations with all of them).

IPS
PVA
MVA
TN

Here's an article discussing panel types:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles...chnologies.htm

You'll also find a search feature that you can look up the panel type a given display model uses:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/panelsearch.htm

Thanks for that info Jim, I wasn't aware of these different panel types.
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Old Apr 15, 2010, 7:40 PM   #12
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Im not sure if my dell is a TN or not. I did pay for the upgraded screen, meaning more pixel count and colors, the ability to look at it at ANY angle and not see any distortions whatsoever, (making it great for movies as well) and it also twice as bright as a standard monitor so its geared towards graphic production. I remember aside from the laptop, the screen upgrade was 250.00 extra by itself. Its very possible mine is not a TN, but if it is, I would say regardless it is flawless at different viewing angles. Also, the Dell screens I use at work are 20" bottom of the barrel and have no color distortions either when viewed from the side. I'd be willing to bet my paycheck they're the cheapest Dell LCD's available and still look real nice. They have way less contrast and brightness than my monitor at home but Im sure they can be tweaked to your liking.
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Old Apr 15, 2010, 8:40 PM   #13
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Don't get concerned about contrast ratio. Basically all it tells you is how much too bright the display will be.
My CRT finally died for good last summer, and I replaced it with a 19" widescreen Acer. Calibration requires using the monitor setting to reduce brightness and contrast first. Almost all LCDs are going to start out too bright - they seem to be better suited to watching videos. The Acer is not bad once I got it sorted out, though the controls are not very handy - I have managed to reset the thing back to defaults when I was trying to make some adjustments - not fun. Cheap, though - $110 from Tiger Direct, and not dead pixels or other weirdness.

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Old Apr 16, 2010, 7:12 AM   #14
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Thanks for that info Jim, I wasn't aware of these different panel types.
There are pros and cons to any of them. But, if you want a wider color gamut and better dynamic range for critical image editing work, you'll want to avoid TN panels (even though images may look nice on them, you don't see everything you do with better panel types).

Now, there are downsides to some of the panel types, too (for example, slower refresh rates with some, oversaturated colors if you're not using a color managed application with some, etc.). Some of them have an sRGB mode you can switch to when not doing photo work to bypass some of the issues, as Windows color management (especially with wide gamut displays) leaves something to be desired if you're not using color managed managed applications.

One tool you can use at the site I posted a link to is their TFT selector to help find choices for different purposes. Just be aware that for best quality for critical editing work, you'll have to compromise in other areas (i.e, input lag and response time may be slower than desired for something like gaming). If you look at their reviews, you'll see sections measuring that kind of thing (as well as sections measuring how wide of a color gamut they cover and much more).

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews.htm
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Old Apr 16, 2010, 5:30 PM   #15
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Thanks, for all your suggestions, although I admit the more technical comments are over my head and, to be honest, I can't afford anything above a TN type panel. I ordered a Dell ST2210 21.5" widescreen. Pretty much their entry level monitor. I think it will suit my needs, and at $149; my budget.
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Old Apr 26, 2010, 2:00 PM   #16
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Sadly, life span of the LCDs is frustrating. My Samsung died after less than 2 years. In another thread i was advised to buy one of these:

[QUOTE=peripatetic;1027459]By all means go for the highest spec box you can; load up with RAM and a multicore CPU, and if you are going to be moving a lot of video data around then a RAID setup. What software are you going to use for your video editing?

I would strongly recommend getting a decent monitor with reasonable colour accuracy. I think that pretty much leaves out Dell altogether.

Recommended brands: Eizo, Lacie, NEC.

After years of using poor monitors I recently purchased a low-end Eizo and it blows away anything I've ever seen from the non-specialist manufacturers for colour work. Finally it's possible to make prints that match what I see on screen. To think of all that time and money wasted!

To get an idea of the sorts of monitors you should be thinking about:

http://shop.colourconfidence.com/section.php?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Actually, the Dell 2209WA (not to be confused with the 2209W which is not an IPS panel) is considered to have the best "bang for the buck" in a 22" display with an IPS panel type.
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Old Apr 26, 2010, 5:36 PM   #17
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To that list of recommended brands, I will add Viewsonic. And some Dell monitors are ok; it depends on who makes them. Sharp makes some of them, but not all, and I don't know who makes the rest.
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Old Apr 26, 2010, 6:21 PM   #18
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TCav: any LCD monitor that will not depend on tiltling angle?
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Old Apr 27, 2010, 10:56 AM   #19
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any LCD monitor that will not depend on tiltling angle?
They all have viewing angles that are quite wide, but for best color fidelity, you're better off being directly in front of the monitor. And really large monitors start looking bad at the edges if you're too close, so you need to back up more, which limits the usefulness of large monitors.

Personally, I prefer 4:3 monitors. (I still use an NEC MultiSync FE990, and I have no intention of letting go of it any time soon.) Widescreen monitors start having color fidelity problems sooner than conventional monitors, at the same diagonal size or screen area.
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Last edited by TCav; Apr 27, 2010 at 11:00 AM. Reason: Spelling. :-(
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Old Apr 27, 2010, 11:15 AM   #20
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There were two threads on this subject. So, I've merged them so that all answers will be in the same place.
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