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Old May 8, 2011, 4:38 PM   #21
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I handle lots & lots of data (TerraBytes of video). How many GBs are you talking about? GigaBytes or TeraBytes? Presuming GBs, I recommend buying a boxed WD 320GB Blue 2.5" HDD and install it into a Sabio external enclosure. Use it exclusively to backup your PIXes - you'll be fine. (If you start messing around with 3.5' drives, then they are much more sensitive to mechanical shock so I would avoid these unless you need TB level storage.)

If you should decide to back up using optical storage, then use DvD RAM or DvD media designated as archive quality. http://adterrasperaspera.com/blog/20...archival-media
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Old May 8, 2011, 8:31 PM   #22
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If you start messing around with 3.5' drives, then they are much more sensitive to mechanical shock
Not sure about that. In my experience they last much longer (several orders of magnitude).
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Old May 9, 2011, 12:34 AM   #23
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http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=947206
(eg, 2.5" Seagate Momentus 5400.6 500GB - Up to 1000 Gs of Shock Resistance )

A high density 3.5" drive on a vertical stand can be ruined if it falls over when running.
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Old May 9, 2011, 7:10 AM   #24
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Very interesting about the durability comparison. I'll look into that as it may influence future buy decisions. altho, any drive that i move around already is 2.5".

i just got a new 2 TB drive and it will become my new backup. allowing the previous 1 TB to be moved off-site. for ease of drive management and data retrieval, i'm trying to update my off-site storage twice a year. mid and xmas.
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Old May 9, 2011, 10:13 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdromel View Post
http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=947206
(eg, 2.5" Seagate Momentus 5400.6 500GB - Up to 1000 Gs of Shock Resistance )

A high density 3.5" drive on a vertical stand can be ruined if it falls over when running.
Any drive shocked whilst running is liable to fail. That includes the internal drives of laptops. But given proper care a 3.5" drive will last way longer than a 2.5" one. My brother uses around 40 laptops in his business and he replaces all (internal) hard drives every 18 months, even if they're still working. Even so he still has disks fail prematurely, as do I. I reckon the mean life of a 3.5" drive is more like 3.5-4 years.

Like most things disks aren't made very well these days. In the past year I've had three 3.5" drives refuse to start after they've been standing disconnected from power on a desk for a month or two. In the two cases I investigated the internal power supply had failed. One of those two was Western Digital, the other Seagate.

I now rely on at least doubled-up backup - I ensure I have at least two copies of the same data at the same time, always on mains-powered 3.5" desktop drives. I use portable USB-powered drives for convenience and portability, but never for backup. It is amazing how often I am called on to help someone out who relied on a single backup and lost it (through mechanical failure).
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Old May 9, 2011, 12:09 PM   #26
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My experience is totally different. Own probably 35 HDDs (doesnt even include the ones at work) mostly 3.5" and have had only one 3.5" WD fail in 10 years and have never had a notebook drive fail. I use the notebook drives to & from work and they have run a zillion hours. My current PC is over seven years old, has four 3.5" drives (WDs & MAxtors) with a zillion hours on those drives & they are great (if a drive should begin to fail then I should see a SMART alert). I also own & use a couple Hitachi 2TBs external (9mos of use so far and use everyday) for movie watching and storage and have not had any issue. However, if you read the user reviews for these drives then you will see that some of the reports show that the drive failed when it was accidentally knocked over while it was running. Meanwhile, Ive actually accidentally had 2.5" drives at work fall off a table and hit the floor while they are running and there was no issue.

HDDs installed in notebooks can be problematic if the notebook is allowed to "cook" the drive as notebooks (especially P4s) are notorious for poor ventilation (hence the laptop coolers).

Before you buy a drive, check the user reviews on newegg. I recommended the medium performance 2.5" WD 320 Blue because it averaged five stars (ie, the maximum rating) based on reports from hundreds of purchasers/users. Drives that fail dont get those kinds of ratings.
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Old May 9, 2011, 12:40 PM   #27
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You sound exceptionally lucky. My experience matches my brother's and that of many others I know here in Belize, in Britain and in the USA. And between us we use a LOT of hard drives!

In the last few years I think I've had six or seven internal desktop 3.5" drives fail, mostly (I suspect) prompted by power fluctuations. In the past six months I've lost an external 3.5" WD 1.5tb drive (five months old and never moved, on or off) and a WD "my passport" USB-powered 500gb drive (10 months old). That one was moved around, but only when off and in a purpose designed shock resistant case. I've also had three laptop internal drives fail, in every case when the machine was sitting on a desk running. In one case I took the drive apart - the drive itself was fine, but the on-board power supply had failed. Just as happened recently to me with the desktop external drive.

I'm currently using three desktop external 3.5" drives, each 2tb, two being Seagate and one WD, four WD "my passport" USB-powered 1tb drives (USB 3.0), and five older "my passport" drives ranging from 750mb down to 120mb. I have two 3tb Seagate drives on order.

I also had a Lacie Firewire drive that was NEVER moved simply refuse to start one day, though it had worked properly a few days previously.

It's worth mentioning that I'm unlikely to buy any more WD drives. They didn't honour their warranties on either of the two drives that failed. What I mean is, they erected so many barriers to me actually getting the drives to them that in the end I gave up.
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Old May 9, 2011, 12:58 PM   #28
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Our own experiences shape our feelings whether they translate to the whole industry or not. I don't even think about warranty repair unless they fail in the first couple of weeks. i can always use the enclosure for a bare drive i have laying on the shelf.

In any case, the whole idea is to have a backup. One is a good start.
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Old May 9, 2011, 2:35 PM   #29
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I only had one drive problem myself in say 10 years and that was a virus issue that I was able to recover from. I use my drives a million + hours without problems. I use Seagate drives whenever possible.

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Old May 9, 2011, 2:46 PM   #30
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Here are some stats for return rates for disk drives, based on returns to a large french retailer. They usually publish them a couple of times/year and a new article with current stats was just posted a few days ago:

http://www.behardware.com/articles/8...rns-rates.html

See the intro page for more about time periods involved.

http://www.behardware.com/articles/8...rns-rates.html

Here's the previous page for disk drives from December 2010 (and as you can see, the 2TB drives did a lot worse during the last period they looked at, so they've improved some since then). Some of the 1TB drives have improved a lot since these stats came out, too. For example, some of the Hitachi 1TB drives were pretty bad (only the Seagate 7200.11 1TB Drives had higher return rates in the 1TB size drives). BTW, I do have some 1TB Seagate 7200.11 drives (got 'em cheap on sale at newegg.com, and knew they tended to have a high failure rate). But, so far, so good (other than one of them is a bit louder than I'm comfortable with). I use them only for backups, not production use.

http://www.behardware.com/articles/8...rns-rates.html
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