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Old Jan 20, 2011, 5:29 PM   #1
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Question Media Storage???

I'm not sure if this is the correct location to put this, if this is not the right place, hopwfully someone will move it to desired location. Anyway, I am trying to find out which type of media storage for digital pictures! I've been told that there really is no good way for storage, cause they all fail in time.
Do I go with CD's, external hard drives or what? I have lost ALOT of pics in the past when the ole laptop crashed and if I would of had some type of storage away from the computere, I would still have a lot of pictures that I needed. Thank you in advance for you'lls time and help with this small item.

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Old Jan 20, 2011, 6:53 PM   #2
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Easy peasy. get two external drives. Make one the place you put all your pictures. organize by year-month-day-event. once in a while backup to the other drive. once in a long while backup to a drive you store somewhere else ("off-site"). I use sync-toy to do my backups.

There's other ways. This way is simple and works well. There's no excuse to lose anything. Every time I copy files from my camera, i make a backup before i delete them from the camera's sd card.

these disks will fail sometime. most likely not at the same time. just buy another at that time and copy from the good one.

good luck.
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 8:27 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weedy View Post
.... Anyway, I am trying to find out which type of media storage for digital pictures! I've been told that there really is no good way for storage, cause they all fail in time.....
Good advice from Frank. You shouldn't rely on a single backup
device. It is also unwise to rely on two identical backup devices.
A pair of identical hard drives just might fail at the same time.
This is most likely with brand new drives. Remember the mass
failures of the IBM 'Deathstar' drives a few years ago.

If you have a CD/DVD burner, you should make regular
backups to good quality CD or DVD media. Verbatim branded
discs are usually better than average for long term reliability.
Always verify after burning so that you are sure the disk is
readable. Store your CD/DVD in proper library cases away
from excessive heat, humidity and direct sunlight. DVD-RAM
is generally considered more reliable than DVD+/- R. I have
no experience with Blu-ray discs. I would be a bit wary of using
newer technology for long term backups.

I use several SATA drives and a couple of external 1TB drives
for day to day backups. Important or irreplaceable data is
backed up regularly to Japanese made Verbatim, Panasonic
or TDK optical media (all three made by Taiyo Yuden).
http://www.yuden.co.jp/ut/product/disks/index.html
I can't stress this point strongly enough: use high quality
optical media. 50% of my backup DVDs are stored off-site
just in case of fire, theft or alien abduction etc...
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 8:40 AM   #4
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I don't bother with cd/dvd backups because once your storage requirements become bigger than 1 or dvds, you have to start managing that too. either backing up only new, changed and new, all once in a while. Then the question becomes, what dvd has the latest copy of an image you can recall editing several times. that's why big drives that hold everything work for me. the directories are by year anyway, so if i ever catch up to disk drive technology space-wise, i could just stop making new backups of the stuff from 10 years ago.

biggest point is to make this simple and quick to do. i use sync-toy practically every day. i start it and go do a little something. when i return, it's done and my images are safe. actually i backup several directories at the same time, not just photos. my mp3s, my documents, my anything-important directory all get backed up. free and with minimal effort.
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Old Feb 14, 2011, 5:03 PM   #5
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Default Media Storage ???

Media Storage ???

I have used everything from a:
- floppy drive,
- tape drive,
- zip drive,
- cd,
- dvd,
- hard drive,
Now I am using flash / memory cards.

frank-in-toronto; (Quote)
that's why big drives that hold everything work for me.
Question: (frank-in-toronto)
Are you talking about a "Hard Drive" ?

===============================================

My Hard Drive History:
I have been using hard drives when they first came out.
Old hard drives were built to be very robust, and very reliable.
I never had one break down. The old hard drives were replaced,
because we only required much larger storage space.

I had a Sata Hard Drive, where the tracking arm, litterly broke to pieces.
My hard drive was completely destroyed and I almost lost everything.
I had to pay about $900.00 to have my disks removed from the broken hard drive,
and placed into a stand bye hard drive.
The company was only able to recover, partial, of my original files.

At least they were able to recover 100% of my pictures and 100% of my documents.
I did loose 50% of Windows = Applications, Drivers and Software.
My hard drive failed exactly 6 weeks after the five (x5) year warranty.

I went to several computer repair and sale locations.
The word is out that the new sata hard drives are not dependable !
The new hard drives are being built very cheap, now !
Hard drive recovery is now a big business in the computer repair sector.
I was also informed that some of the IDE hard drives, are better built.
Your warranty only covers the hard drive, "not" your saved software !

===============================================

Question:
Does your present power supply have an internal spike protector ?
If your power supply, spikes / blows up, it could destroy your hard drive.

Notes:
No longer will I trust any media for storage, that has moving parts.
I also use my second (2nd), "totally independent" - "exterior hard drive", through a USB jack.

I am now using memory / flash cards, that can retain:
- images
- data
- music
There are now memory / flash cards that can also hold movies.
Inside a USB - memory / flash card holder, (plug),

I am using a SDHC (Class 4) 4MB/s 4GB memory / flash card,
I have dozens of dated folders, containing 1,082 images, on only 1.34 GB, of 4 GB total.
Flash / Memory Cards: (Advantages)
- fast and easy
- non moving parts
- very small and portable
- minimum hardware requirements (USB Jack)
- works on computers (USB Jack)
- works on new camera's
- works on new TV's (USB Jack)

===============================================

Facts:
There is NO "electronic hardware", that is 100 % reliable.
DVD disk media, is a permanent, safe format, for storage. (4.7 GB - each).
DVD disk media, is also easy to purchase and cheap.

Even though I am now using memory / flash cards,
I will always use DVD disks for backup, of my important files / pictures.
TV-DVD players and PC-DVD players, use different types of DVD (RW) disks. (+) or (-).
There are now computer DVD players, that can burn / record (+) and (-).
Safest & Most Secure: (Internet Media Storage)
Like many companies, many individuals are now saving all of their important information,
in their private library, supplied on the internet.
- most secure
- theft proof
- fire proof
- permanent

===============================================

Conclusion:
- There is never any easy way, or short cut, to save your important information !
- Today's made electronics, is not reliable, or dependable. (Fact).
.
..
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Old Feb 15, 2011, 10:16 AM   #6
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I would have to say the most reliable long-term storage when properly handled would be optical discs (CD / DVD / BluRay). By "properly handled" I mean transferred directly from the burner to a sleeve in a sturdy hardshell "CD Book", removed only when they are the last remaining copy of their contents. The reason I say this is that kept safe from moisture, cracking and scratching, there's no reason why DVDs and BRDs (BluRay Discs) can't last 1000 years without corrupting, whereas magnetic media degenerates over time. I'd say Blu-Ray discs are the most reliable, because they have a more durable coating over the readable surface and generally a stronger build - plus they have 25 GB of space.

I must confess that I have a large number of photos on only one hard drive at the moment - my backup external hard drive failed and I have yet to get a new one.
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Old Feb 15, 2011, 4:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jWest View Post
I would have to say the most reliable long-term storage when properly handled would be optical discs (CD / DVD / BluRay). By "properly handled" I mean transferred directly from the burner to a sleeve in a sturdy hardshell "CD Book", removed only when they are the last remaining copy of their contents. The reason I say this is that kept safe from moisture, cracking and scratching, there's no reason why DVDs and BRDs (BluRay Discs) can't last 1000 years without corrupting, whereas magnetic media degenerates over time. I'd say Blu-Ray discs are the most reliable, because they have a more durable coating over the readable surface and generally a stronger build - plus they have 25 GB of space.

I must confess that I have a large number of photos on only one hard drive at the moment - my backup external hard drive failed and I have yet to get a new one.
i wouldn't wait a minute longer if I were you.

as for cds and dvds being long lived. don't count on it. read about inner and outer errors. jitter. it's only the miracle of error correction that allows dvds to give the appearance of error-free writes/reads. it's just a facade. and if you change dvd drives, you may not be so error-free anymore. anyway, all optical media is too small for much use. estimate your yearly accumulation of media files. it may be huge. so to me, hard drives are the only feasible method of storage. something as cumbersome as writing to a dvd, putting it away, updating the library index somehow...all too much work to be done daily. however, a sync operation can be automated even. so it will be done.

those that are using dvds and actually backing up new files same day are better men/women than me.
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Old Feb 16, 2011, 1:16 AM   #8
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Default Media Storage ???

Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
... estimate your yearly accumulation of media files. it may be huge. so to me, hard drives are the only feasible method of storage....
Hello Frank:
So you are doing a 100% back-up on a second hard drive.
You state that it is feasible, but is this a reliable operation ?
In Canada be prepared to pay around $900.00 for a hard drive recovery.

Questions: (Frank)
Is your back-up hard drive, an internal (P.C.) hard drive, constantly powered up and ready to run ?
What are you going to do when your hard drive has a major failure ?

Facts:
Due to lack of reliability of present hard drives, I no longer see too much from Intel, discussing using "RAID" for matrix storage. for hard drives.

Due to Microsoft Copy Write Protection, and internal software protection programs, you can do a 100% Windows "Back-up", but you can "NOT" do a 100% Windows - "Restore", on a "new" hard drive.

The only way to "Restore" your Windows, it will only work, using the "original" hard drive, containing the "original" version of Windows. (Copy Write Protection).

Do "NOT" waste your time and storage media, backing-up any Microsoft Windows "files". (Copy Write Protection).

Conclusions:
I do agree with (Frank) that it is much faster and easier to use a second (2nd) hard drive.

I also use a second hard drive, that is an "exterior", hard drive, enclosed in a (H.D.) container:
- totally independent from my P.C.
- uses a separate power supply
- only powered up and used, for back-up usage
- using a USB connection
- to back-up, everything I require
BUT
I also use DVD disks (extra) to permanently store and save my:
- images
- important files

Special Note: (Images)
Once you loose your very important media from one (x1) system, will your present back-up stored system, "restore" - what you have lost ?
Images (pictures) of today are no longer developed pictures, from camera neagatives.

Our images (pictures) are now all digital, using electronic software.
It will only take one (x1) hardware malfunction, and you could loose "everything".
.
..
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Old Feb 16, 2011, 2:30 AM   #9
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Hi IMHO data is un safe if it is written in only one place so you will have to back it up to an external source. This isnt anything we dont understand and we all know we have to do it. Where to do it easiest way I think is get a NAS storage device and set it up as RAID 5. This way it can afford to loose a disk and all you have to do is replace that disk no data lost. to go beyound this then you could get a LTO4 tape drive and back up the RAID device.
If you do regular back ups then I think the computer hard drive plus and NAS RAID should work well
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Old Feb 16, 2011, 7:52 AM   #10
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If you're at the level of knowledge to set up a nas and raid and even a tape drive, you're not reading this thread for backup concepts.

For those less knowledgeable, a couple of external usb drives will work just fine. a third should be used of off-site storage and updated once in a while. This year I estimate I'll generate 300 GB of images (i could lower this by culling the raw files more strictly). current 1TB drives are cheap. drives are growing faster than my needs so i'll be ok for a few years at least.

i couldn't imagine managing hundreds of dvds, and if i edit a series of files from a previous year, somehow i'd have to track that the newly editted files are on some new dvds.


old boy, this thread is about data backup, not o/s. secure data backup has been well understood for decades. if it's important stuff you'll be doing daily, weekly, monthly, yearly and have off-site storage with tested recovery methods. i don't want to build this up too much but most people do no backup. that can't be right. but something too complex will never get done. simple/quick/reliable. that's what i always recommend.
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