Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Misc Forums > Computers and Operating Systems

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 11, 2011, 9:45 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Posts: 866
Default Monitors - what's the most useful screen shape?

The older of my two monitors is a 19" Asus: its screen is 4:3. format - often called 16:12.

My newer one is a 20" HP - its screen is 4:5 format - often called 16:10.

Some monitors now recommended for working with Photoshop have screens with a format of 16:9.

Now I'm thinking about buying something bigger - a 22" or maybe a 24" monitor, but other than thinking that I should avoid TN and go for IPS, I can't decide what format I should look for.

The 16:9 format seems (to me) to be uncomfortably wide, but maybe that's because I've got used to the 16:10 shape.

What format do other folk find the most useful?

Last edited by Herb; Feb 12, 2011 at 11:14 AM.
Herb is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 11, 2011, 11:34 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

"As large as will fit at a good price" is my criteria. If it is large the format doesn't really matter.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 12, 2011, 11:23 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oakville, ON
Posts: 97
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb View Post
... I can't decide what format I should look for.
Broadcast HDTV is all 16:9, so to me, it makes some sense if you're going to use your computer as a PVR. (Think student in a dorm.)

If you do a lot of spreadsheets, wider aspect-ratio monitors can be nice.

For photography, maybe it would make a difference if most of your work was one orientation or the other (portrait v. landscape). My pics are a mix.

Also, I think a case can be made for a dual monitor setup for photographers. A good-size wide gamut monitor, with good colour calibration, for photo previews. The other monitor can be almost anything as it is for cataloging, tool palettes, etc.

Craig
PvrFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2011, 11:55 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
NewsyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Vancouver, BC Canada
Posts: 231
Default

You have to go with what the market offers in various size ranges where they feature either an IPS panel of some type, S-PVA, cPVA, or A-MVA (it's back!). These are all panel types with better viewing characteristics than the common TN panel.

16:9 1920x1080 is the typical form factor in current monitors in the size range of 21.5" to 23".

16:10 1920x1200 can be found in 24".

16:10 1920x1200 .... 26" (actually 25.5")

16:9 2560x1440 .... 27"

16:10 2560x1600 .... 30"

The 16:9 or 16:10 are not so bad for editing as they give you space on the side to park your tool menus.

Imho, it is of more value to you to get the right panel and a hardware calibrator.

Do you have a calibrator?

Sounds like you may already be using dual monitors, is this correct?

The other decision to make is whether you want to go with a standard sRGB gamut panel or a wide gamut panel where you have about 100% coverage of both the sRGB and AdobeRGB color spaces. Using a wide gamut monitor will demand that you be fully conversant with "color management" issues including the assigning of ICC profiles and the use of color managed software for viewing and editing (including web browsers). Users of wide gamut monitors who bought one not knowing of the issues typically complain of overly vibrant reds, greens, and skin tones.


You can get a budget e-IPS panel sRGB gamut monitor for between $199 and $300 (21.5" to 23"), a 24" for $400.

Wide gamut monitors start at 22" 1680x1050 for a NEC P221 with a S-PVA panel and these are about $330 to $380 online in the USA.

At 24" you can get a Dell U2410 for about $440 on sale/coupon, an HP LP2475w for about $500 and then a NEC PA241w for about $900 w/o calibrator or $1100 with the NEC SpectraViewII calibrator (recommended). I suggest you be very careful with the U2410 - do your research on tints.

In the 27" units you can get the Dell U2710 for about $800 on sale/coupon, the Apple Cinema Screen for about $900, and a NEC PA271 for well above $1200.

Personally, I lean to using smaller less expensive dual monitors with maybe using one of your old monitors to hold the toolbars when editing along with a newer monitor for viewing the image.
.

Last edited by NewsyL; Feb 14, 2011 at 11:58 AM.
NewsyL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2011, 2:42 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default

I presently have a 17" wide-screen on my laptop and am strongly considering getting myself a 32" 1080i (or p) tv for dual usage. Don't eat me alive but is anything wrong with that? All my photos are intended for viewing on computers or tvs anyway. Noe will be printed. If that matters.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2011, 7:33 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
... strongly considering getting myself a 32" 1080i (or p) tv for dual usage. ...
Sounds good IF you have space for that on your desk. You will want to be able to use the laptop at the same time as viewing TV sometimes, or use the 32" and 17" as dual monitors. 24" is as big as will fit in the space I have.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2011, 9:14 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDrew View Post
Sounds good IF you have space for that on your desk. You will want to be able to use the laptop at the same time as viewing TV sometimes, or use the 32" and 17" as dual monitors. 24" is as big as will fit in the space I have.
I have a 26" crt tv on my desk right now. if i replace that with even a cheap lcd, i'm way ahead in space. i'll need to check if my laptop support dual monitors. i really like that setup.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2011, 11:28 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Posts: 866
Default

Wow - You've all given me a lot to think about. The point about a wider monitor giving more room at the side to park tool menus hadn't occurred to me but it's certainly persuaded me to stop worrying about the relative virtues of 16:10 and 16:9.

I began to think about a bigger & better monitor after buying an older Mac setup that included one of their very early Cinema monitors. It seemed, to me, to display exquisite detail without exaggerating colors. (Unfortunately there was an accident with the Mac & the entire circuitry fried along with the monitor).

I haven't closely studied monitor calibration yet, but after admiring the Cinema's display I looked that the settings in my 20" HP w2007 and reduced the color saturation from the default 0f 300 down to 250 - and the result seems (to me) to be much closer to that of the Mac Cinema.
Herb is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 15, 2011, 11:33 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
NewsyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Vancouver, BC Canada
Posts: 231
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb View Post
I haven't closely studied monitor calibration yet, but after admiring the Cinema's display I looked that the settings in my 20" HP w2007 and reduced the color saturation from the default 0f 300 down to 250 - and the result seems (to me) to be much closer to that of the Mac Cinema.
Try this website for fine tuning. It is still "eyeballing" so not as accurate as a hardware calibrator but will be better than nothing.

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

Before you do that, you want to ensure that the system you have is using the correct monitor ICC profile.

Sounds like you use a Mac.... I don't know Mac's all that much; I recall reading that they have had automatic color management built in for years. How true I don't know.

On Windows systems using XP, Vista, and Win7 there is a Color Management app available. Win users are letting the WinOS manage it for them automatically which is not the right option imho, or when they realize they need to assign the profile manually, are constantly trying to assign an the wrong ICC profile in this app. They will use the sRGB IEC profile or the AdobeRGB profile when they should be assigning the manufacturer's OEM default ICC profile to the monitor.

If you need clarification on this let us know.

As to using profiles and trying to calibrate a monitor by eyeball from a website using a browser.... not all browsers are created equal. Most are NOT fully color managed - while some can recognize the color space info embedded in online images, most don't use the monitor profile in presenting the image for you to view.

http://www.gballard.net/psd/go_live_...profiles.html#

.

Last edited by NewsyL; Feb 15, 2011 at 11:38 AM.
NewsyL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 15, 2011, 3:26 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, B.C., Canada
Posts: 866
Default

No, I gave up on Macs when it turned out that they can't run Faststone.

And, thanks for the link to the gballard site. It's helping me to begin to grasp some of this color management stuff.

Incidentally, I've just discovered of this site - I wonder what you think of it -

http://www.normankoren.com/makingfin...tml#QuickGamma

Last edited by Herb; Feb 15, 2011 at 5:24 PM.
Herb is online now   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:10 AM.