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Old Oct 24, 2011, 9:41 PM   #1
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Default Macintosh and PC quality

I've owned several Macs including a G4 Tower and a G5 Tower.

They were obviously very well made. They were in strong, well designed cases, the components were beautifully arranged in an orderly way and the interiors were easily accessible. Some PCs on the other hand I've found to be arranged more like a rat's nest - very untidy and sometimes hard to get at too.

I assume that the newer Macs carry on that same tradition, but one question bothers me.

The hard drives in the Macs were from the same manufacturers who supplied PC hard drives (I swapped them - and memory sticks too - back & forth between the Macs and PCs & they worked).

I assume that Mac motherboards can't be interchanged with PC motherboards, but I'm curious about the quality of Mac components in general.

So this is my question - are the electronic and other components used in Macs of any different quality than those we get in PCs?

Last edited by Herb; Oct 25, 2011 at 6:47 PM. Reason: Typing mistake
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Old Oct 25, 2011, 12:18 PM   #2
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I wouldn't worry too much about hardware quality in general.

You really need to look at a specific model to see how it works and how reliable it is. Motherboards, Power Supplies, Hard Drives and more have different levels of performance and reliability versus price. You have to look at each system on a case by case basis.

But, if you 're not locked into an Apple OS, then your choices in hardware increase dramatically.

So, if you're looking for a new PC, I'd give members a better idea of budget and needs. Chances are, you can find a far more powerful PC with great reliability at lower prices than you can sticking with an Apple.

Personally, the *only* reason I'd ever consider an Apple computer anymore is if I wanted something unique to OS X that I couldn't get with Windows or Linux (and even then, I'd consider going "hackintosh" versus paying what Apple wants for hardware).

But, many Apple users here really love their computers. So, there are pros and cons to any solution.
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Old Oct 25, 2011, 9:42 PM   #3
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PC hardware components are all over the map ranging from top-notch 'never-gonna-fail-in-a-lifetime' to the grossly-unfit. Just read about a guy building his own PC and the power cord exploded on first connection!!

Apple generally aims for good-quality, reliable components. Like everybody, however, they make more money if they can pay less. So they've been bitten by failing parts on certain models. In those cases, they virtually always fess up and offer a repair extension program that keeps the user whole.

Jim often touts how much choice there is in the PC world. I've been braving those waters again just recently. I'm not a neophyte--I' started with VisiCalc on the Apple II and have juggled IBM mainframes and all sorts of minicomputers whilst sorting out DOS batch files and installing Windows 1.04. I use Windows at work because I have to; I use Mac at home because I want to.

I've been looking to put together a Linux box to run the MythTV backend and serve files in the house. Sorting out which CPU is compatible with which motherboard and fits in what case is CRAZY-MAKING!!! Jargon piled on bafflegarb. Endless incomprehensible marketing-speak about 'features' that may or may not have any relevance. Subtle incompatibilities that may cripple the assembled system if you put the wrong tab A in Slot B. I think the 'savings' everyone talks about are going to amount to about $0.05 per hour invested. No wonder the best-selling books for Windows computer are the "For Dummies" series. Sometimes Apple's systems aren't geared exactly for your specific needs but at least you know the d*mm thing is going to work out of the box!

Craig

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Old Oct 26, 2011, 2:58 AM   #4
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Hi I have said this before I am sure but I am or was a 30 year PC person and last year I went Mac. After looking around for a new computer and taking in my wifes comments "what ever you get do we have to have all those wires every where". I looked at all in ones and when I did all the working out and compared what was on the market then the Mac came out best for my needs. So far its been reliable and I have not yet found anything it cant do. Will it be more reliable only time will tell. Is better made no idea. All I know is that it works straight out of the box I didnt spend a week transfering data over when I got it I didnt have to go and look for drivers or get updates to get programs and devices to get them working. Will I go back to a PC I dont think so
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 6:27 PM   #5
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Thanks for all the interesting comments. At present I'm using an HP a1130n (bought it used last year) & now with a better video card installed plus some extra RAM & displaying on an HP ZR24w screen. I'm using 64bit Windows7 too though I still obstinately prefer the way Windows 2000 is organised.

My only complaint is that my favourite Internet site (a British magazine that has blogs & discusses current affairs) and has displayed painfully slowly lately, but I think that's probably because of increased traffic and the cable service from our local Internet provider not being the fastest.

Last edited by Herb; Oct 27, 2011 at 6:36 PM. Reason: Deleted name of magazine - thought it might be looked on as advertising)
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Old Nov 27, 2011, 4:42 PM   #6
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Just to add my 2 cents worth to this subject....

I've also been building / playing / using computers ever since they became popular with the home enthusiast.

The main difference between (IBM) PC and Apple computers is that Apple has been in control of the hardware and it's operating system, so there there is little chance of incompatible problems creeping up, while with PC computers there are thousands of combinations of motherboards, processors, graphic cards etcetera that problems can and do pop up at times.

Are Apple products made better....? A few years ago I would have said yes definitely
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Old Nov 28, 2011, 9:08 PM   #7
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After fifteen years or so of using Macs almost exclusively, I have dived back into the PC world, at least as a trial. The reason has to do with the lack of hardware choices in the Mac environment. I bought a Lenovo Thinkpad with a 12.5" IPS screen and upgraded it from 4 to 8GB of RAM with a $20 chip. For my unique approach, the keyboard is preferable to the flat keys on the Macbooks, and the matte screen more functional.

I still prefer the Mac OS X system and I really like Aperture for photo processing more than Lightroom, but maybe I can learn to better appreciate LR. It's not the final result that differs so much, but Aperture's approach seems less cluttered and more accessible to me.
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