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Old Mar 7, 2012, 2:54 PM   #11
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Thanks Jim. I'm printing that out so that I can have it handy when I try to install Wine's latest version.
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Old Mar 9, 2012, 4:35 PM   #12
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BTW, while browsing through latest updates at distrowatch.com today, I noticed a new review of Zorin 5.2 here:

http://duskfire.wordpress.com/2012/0...t-impressions/

If you look at the last paragraph in the review, it echoes what I mentioned about it earlier. It's based on an older Ubuntu release (11.04), and the software repos are not going to have the newest versions of apps in it + the Ubuntu version it's based on is *not* a Long Term Supported Release.

That's a downside of using some of the distros that are based on more mainsteam distros like Ubuntu, as by the time they integrate new themes and menus, the base distro may be close to becoming obsolete.

Basically, developers take a Distro like Ubuntu, then customize it using with different menus, themes and preinstalled applications, put a different name on it, and publish it.

That can be a good thing. But, it can also be a bad thing, when the changes made are not transferable to a newer base version of the distro they started with.

Now, it looks like Zorin is working on a new 6.x release using the latest Ubuntu 11.10 as the base. But, an even newer version of Ubuntu (12.04 LTS, which will be a long term support release) will be finished next month. Yet, they still haven't integrated the Gnomenu system in Zorin 5.2 into Ubuntu 11.10. That's not good if you want to use more current software from available repos.

It looks like they published a new Release Candidate of what they're calling Zorin Lite Education 6 today using an LXDE desktop with an Ubuntu 11.10 base, as you can see from this Blog Post about it

http://zoringroup.com/blog/2012/03/0...idate-is-here/

But, from what I can tell, they have not figured out a way to integrate the Gnomenu system used by the mainstream Zorin releases like 5.2 into newer versions of Ubuntu (something newer than Ubuntu 11.04), as you can tell from this Blog post:

http://zoringroup.com/blog/2012/02/2...ut-zorin-os-6/

That's really the most unusual thing about Zorin from what I can see (using the Gnomenu system by default). They're the only distro I'm aware of using that menu system (even though it's easy to install in many other distros if you want it). They also have Wine and some of the related helper packages installed. But, again, you can easily install those packages in other distros, too.

I suspected that would be the case (unable to easily integrate the Gnomenu system with current Ubuntu versions). With older Ubuntu versions, a couple of commands was all that would be needed to use that menu system (no need to go with Zorin, as it's available for many other distros, too). But, with the latest version of Ubuntu, that menu system has compatibility issues. So, distros that rely on simple installation of new menus and themes while using a mainstream distro base like Ubuntu are going to have issues trying to migrate to versions supporting newer software.

Now, no offense, and I'm sure it's a good looking distro to some users. But, the bottom line is that it's simply Ubuntu with some eye candy and different menus, themes and preinstalled apps, and if those changes are not compatible with the latest Ubuntu releases, you're going to end up with a distro without support for the newest versions of many applications, since they're using software repositories from older Ubuntu versions.

So, personally, I'd avoid it.
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Old Mar 20, 2012, 1:13 PM   #13
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Jim - While pottering about with Zorin over the past few days, I got more and more frustrated and disappointed with it. Like you, I've come to the conclusion that (for me) it's better avoided. On the other hand I've come to like gOS more and more - so much so that I've removed the hard drive from my main computer and replaced it with a different one on which I've installed gOS. Here's what the Desktop now looks like - http://www.pbase.com/mtu_fulani/image/142193023/large
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Old Mar 20, 2012, 1:51 PM   #14
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gOS is discontinued and the latest release uses an old Ubuntu 8.04 base that's been obsolete for a while now, meaning you won't be able to get newer versions of most software for it, and it's no longer being patched (bugs, security issues, etc.).

It's just Ubuntu 8.04.1 with some "eye candy" (and it's using the Avant Window Manager, which is one of a number of similar Window Managers that you can install in Linux distros if you like that kind of thing) with Google Gadgets for Linux.

I'd suggest sticking to a newer distro version using a more current linux kernel, current software repositories, etc., versus trying the ones that are using obsolete software repositories that are no longer being maintained.

You can find a lot of different window managers, fancy Mac like docks, and "bells, whistles and buzzers" that you can install with a few mouse clicks from the software managers in major distros.

But, I'd start with a mainstream Linux distro that's current versus obsolete (and gOS is discontinued and using an obsolete and no longer supported ubuntu 8.04 base). ;-)
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Old Apr 22, 2012, 11:00 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb View Post
When looking at a website about Linux Mandriva, I discovered that it lists 21 different varieties - from ALT Linux to Zenwalk. This is the URL - http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2011/09/01...p-2011-review/

I've tried several of them - Ubuntu, Mint, Mandriva, gOS, and Parsix. The first three of those have too many bells & whistles for my liking. Mandriva was the most frustrating because often, if I clicked on something to see what it did - it certainly did whatever it was - but I could find no way to undo it.

On the other hand gOS seemed to be a bit simpler and installed much faster than any other. But it and included Wine (something I've never used before). Using Wine I found I could install both Faststone Image Viewer and Photoshop. On the other hand, after doing that, Firefox stopped operating properly. gOS incidentally has an interface that looks a bit like that of Macs. It also has some very large and ugly and ikons on its opening page, but they can be easily deleted.

Parsix seems (to me) to be a bit more sophisticated than gOS.

Has anybody else tried these or any of the other versions among the 21 listed? What do you think of them?

While doing this I was also persuaded to try out a system called Reactos. The descriptions of it sounded interesting, but I got nowhere with it....
ReactOS is way too early in its development to be anything but an interesting toy to play with. It's nowhere near mature enough to do anything except run the most basic windows apps.

Who knows though, a few years down the line and it might actually get to the point where it can run most programs well.
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Old Apr 26, 2012, 11:45 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
gOS is discontinued and the latest release uses an old Ubuntu 8.04 base that's been obsolete for a while now, meaning you won't be able to get newer versions of most software for it, and it's no longer being patched (bugs, security issues, etc.).
...
[snip]
...
I'd suggest sticking to a newer distro version using a more current linux kernel, current software repositories, etc., versus trying the ones that are using obsolete software repositories that are no longer being maintained.
....
BTW, Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Kubuntu 12.04 LTS were officially released today. These are "Long Term Support" releases and will be supported with updates and security patches for 5 years.

See the release announcements for them at distrowatch.com here:

Kubuntu 12.04 LTS:
http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=07220

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS:
http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=07219

I prefer a KDE based desktop, so I downloaded the final release for Kubuntu 12.04 earlier and plan on test driving it later today. See more about it here:

http://www.kubuntu.org/

But, I use the KDE Classic versus Kickoff style menu (just right click on the start button to change it to Classic), and I also install the Lancelot menu launcher with KDE based distros I use (and I use a Mepis 11 based "remix" most of the time, with lots of updates and newer application versions from community repositories, versus what you find in the default Mepis 11 and Debian Stable software repositories).

You'll find *lots* of ways to customize a desktop to "suit your fancy" with Linux distros (different menu systems, themes, available software and repositories etc.). ;-)

New versions of Lubuntu (LXDE desktop), Xubuntu (Xfce desktop), Edubuntu (geared towards school environments), Mythbuntu (geared towards media services), Ubuntu Studio (geared with more apps related to photography, audio and video processing), and other derivatives based on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS with different desktops were also released today.

I'm also seeing some of the third party "remixes" using an Ubuntu 12.04 LTS base coming along. For example, LuninuX OS 12 (a distro with Docky preinstalled for more of a Mac OS X look and feel) released a Beta yesterday using an Ubuntu 12.04 LTS beta base. So, I wouldn't expect the final release (versus Beta) to take too long to be completed now that Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Final was released today.

More distros using the same software base and repositories should follow soon. For example, Linux Mint version 13 using an Ubuntu 12.04 Base with an available Cinnamon based desktop should be released next month (see the comments in This Blog Post about an end of May release for Linux Mint 13), and there are sure to be many more distros using the same Ubuntu 12.04 LTS base coming out soon with different desktops, themes, preinstalled software, etc.

OpenSUSE, Fedora and others should also have newer releases out within the next few months (and you'll see third party "remixes" based on those coming out, too)

You've got lots of choices in distros using a more current software base with better support for security patches, etc.

So, I would not use an unsupported distro based on an obsolete Ubuntu 8.04 software base like gOS when you've got hundreds of distro choices with more current software available, using a variety of different desktops with different "looks and feel" to them. ;-)
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Old Apr 26, 2012, 10:39 PM   #17
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Just for curiosity I again (today) installed gOS 3.1 on an older computer, to share a hard drive with Windows XP (HE).

After it had installed, a box popped up saying that I could download 378 updates to gOS. They are being installed as I write this.

Would these be carry-overs from several years ago so that they too are obsolete?
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Old Apr 27, 2012, 5:06 AM   #18
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Actually, it looks like Ubuntu 8.04 was a Long Term Support (LTS) release, launched in April 2008. The latest gOS version is using an Ubuntu 8.04 base and software repositories, which is where most of the updates you saw came from).

Ubuntu will provide no further security updates for desktop packages used by 8.04 LTS after this month (although server related packages will get updates for another year). Note that even though it's been updated with security patches, you'll find that newer versions of most software will not be in it's repositories and will not work on it, because the newer versions will have dependencies on newer package and library versions.

So, you're stuck with old versions of most Linux based software when using a release like that (forget finding newer versions of products like digiKam, GIMP, etc., as they're not going to run on it unless you jump through hoops by modifying some of the code so that it doesn't depend on newer versions of other packages and compile it yourself).

The LTS releases are designed to overlap to give businesses ample time to upgrade before support ends. For example, 8.04 LTS was released in April 2008 with support (security patches) for the desktop versions ending April 2012, followed by 10.04 LTS which was released in April 2010 with desktop support ending April 2013; with the latest being 12.04 LTS, released yesterday, with desktop support extended for 5 years for it through April 2017 for Ubuntu itself (although the Ubuntu Studio 12.04 LTS desktop that's geared for content creation with more apps for video, image and audio editing will only be supported for 3 years through April 2015).

Note that even though new LTS versions are released every 2 years, when you look at Ubuntu as a whole, new major versions have a 6 month release cycle (for example, development has already started on Ubuntu 12.10, due for release in October 2012), and if you want newer versions of most software (image editors and viewers, office suites, video players and editors, etc.), it's a good idea to upgrade it periodically. The LTS releases are good for businesses that don't want to upgrade most software very often and only need security patches. But, for individuals that want the latest versions of media players, image editors, office suites, etc., you'll want to upgrade it from time to time (I tend to upgrade at every major release for distros I use, so I have access to the latest versions of software I use).

As for gOS itself (versus the Ubuntu related software in it), The developer closed it's web site a while back without warning, and nobody even knows where to find the source code for the gOS changes that were made on top of Ubuntu.

See more about the history of gOS on this wikipedia page about it, noting the developer's site has reported an unavailable message since February 2011, which is still there today if you go to http://http://www.thinkgos.com/ (with no warning about it from the developer before it went "dark"). As a result, nobody has continued any work on it, since they can't get to the original source code.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GOS_%28operating_system%29

A group of users did start an "Unofficial" forum site for it after the gOS developer's site went dark without any explanation in February 2011. But, it doesn't look like there has been any activity there in a while (the last post I see on this "unofficial" forums site was made in September of last year):

http://gosforums.org/

In any event, if you want a supported distro (not one that is based on Ubuntu code from years ago, with the original gOS developer's site unavailable), and want to use newer versions of Linux software, you'll want a newer distro.

I'd suggest test driving some of the latest distros using an Ubuntu 12.04 LTS base released yesterday for starters. You'll see the announcements for them at http://www.distrowatch.com

I've already got Kubuntu 12.04 LTS installed in a Virtual Machine (using Mepis 11 as the host OS), and will probably install it on a netbook I use (which has Win 7, Mepis 11, and Kubuntu 11.10 on it right this minute), as well as add it to a partition on my primary desktop (which has Win 7, Mepis 11, Mint 11, and OpenSUSE 12.1 on it right now).

I like to be able to use newer versions of open source software available for Linux (image editors, video players, office suites, etc.), and you don't get that using an old Linux distro release based on Ubuntu 8.04 code released years ago (as *most* newer open source software versions for linux are *not* going to run on it because of dependencies on newer packages and libraries that are not available for a release that old).
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Old May 8, 2012, 4:23 PM   #19
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My personal setup of Linux is the following.
Ubuntu 12.04 with the Gnome Classic shell installed with compiz for pretty desktop effects. Wine 1.3 (if you want to use Photoshop on Linux do NOT upgrade past this version) I have Photoshop CS5 (working on getting CS6 to run), Photomatix v4.2 installed along with Portrait professional 10. All are 64 bit version but 32 bit works well too.

If you choose Ubuntu make sure to install the gnome classic shell as it will provide (in my opinion) a nicer interface for photo editing and quick access to other programs without having to use the god awful Unity interface.

If you decide to use Ubuntu and need help getting it to run Photoshop please let me know, I spent almost a month figuring it out and am more than happy to share the knowledge

Last edited by tswen; May 8, 2012 at 4:27 PM.
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Old May 8, 2012, 5:30 PM   #20
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Wine 1.3, huh?

I'm using Wine 1.5.3 from the Mepis 11 repos with a Debian stable base (along with Wine Tricks and more installed), which lets me use programs like My Publisher that I couldn't get to start under Wine 1.4 and earlier.

But, I don't try to use Photoshop and don't know how it would behave using Wine 1.5.3
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