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Old Dec 9, 2013, 7:35 PM   #1
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Default OpenSUSE 13.1

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Linux Zorin question


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Originally Posted by gjtoth View Post
Sorry... can't help ya. I use OpenSuse.
Have you installed OpenSUSE 13.1 yet?

I've got a new PC (that came with Win 8 on it), and I'm leaning towards using OpenSUSE 13.1 as it's primary OS (only booting into Windows for testing camera manufacturers' software as needed).

I don't use Windows very often anyway, and bcache was integrated into the Linux kernel beginning with version 3.10, making the latest OpenSUSE a great candidate (since I already have some SSDs I could use for that purpose).

Unlike Intel SRT which only uses an SSD for read cache, or ZFS which only gives you write through cache, bcache can use an SSD for both write through and write-back cache. More about bcache here:

http://bcache.evilpiepirate.org/

That's similar to what Apple markets as their "Fusion" drive, where you get super fast read and write speeds with an SSD married to a physical drive (up until you write more to the SSD than it can stay "caught up" with writing it back to the physical drive).

Since I don't reboot very often, most of what I'd be working on would be an the OS RAM cache anyway, with the SSD containing most of anything else I'd be working on.

It's a block level cache (so it doesn't make any difference what file system you use it with, as you just tie the partitions to the SSD you want to use with bcache).

Of course, I wouldn't get that benefit with Windows (which I'd just leave on the physical hard drive for when I needed it for anything).

But, with LInux (which I use more than 99% of the time, only booting into Win 7 every month or two), it may be a better way to go, and just use the SSD for read and write caching to it with bcache with a distro like OpenSUSE 13.1).

I'm also considering just using Btrfs for default file system with OpenSUSE 13.1.

Yea.. OpenSUSE releases tend to be a bit buggy when first released. But, the latest 13.1 release will have 3 year support via what they refer to as Evergreen, and I'm sure we'll see a lot of updates fixing any remaining bugs soon.

I keep OpenSUSE installed on my desktops anyway (I just haven't installed the latest version of it).

They've also refined and debugged Btrfs significantly from what I've read about it, which offers a lot of benefits (snapshots, etc.) for a file system (very similar to ZFS in it's feature set). So, that kind of more robust file system system combined with bcache for speed improvements is something I'm thinking about implementing.

Anyway, thoughts appreciated.

I usually stick to Debian based distros (although I also keep distros like OpenSUSE and Kubuntu installed in other partitions).

But, given that OpenSUSE (with the latest 13.1 release) seems to be making more progress with newer features like bcache, and newer file systems like btrfs (with built in tools to make disk snapshots easier), I'm thinking about using it as my primary OS instead on my latest PC (still in the box, as I haven't had the time to mess with it yet)

Again, if you have any experience with OpenSUSE 13.1, your thoughts would be appreciated (especially regarding Btfs and snapshot support) as I need to start setting up my new PC soon (just a refurb Dell XPS 8500 with a Core i7 3770 and 12GB of memory, but I have a couple of Samsung 830 SSDs I could use with it to take advantage of the latest bcache support)
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Old Dec 9, 2013, 8:14 PM   #2
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Herb:

My apologies if I'm "hijacking" your thread.

I just noticed the post this thread from gjtoth regarding OpenSUSE, and wanted to see if he had any thoughts on the latest OpenSUSE 13.1 release (which I am strongly considering making my primary OS now, even though I usually stick to Debian based distros).

As for Zorin... I haven't tried it in a while. Personally, I didn't like the defaults as far as how they handled screen based features (composting, etc.).

IMO, they should have left that kind of thing disabled by default, as not everyone wants to see those types of "Desktop Effects" (although they may be appealing to a younger generation, I found them to be "over the top".
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Old Dec 10, 2013, 7:07 AM   #3
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Herb:

My apologies if I'm "hijacking" your thread.

I just noticed the post this thread from gjtoth regarding OpenSUSE, and wanted to see if he had any thoughts on the latest OpenSUSE 13.1 release (which I am strongly considering making my primary OS now, even though I usually stick to Debian based distros).

As for Zorin... I haven't tried it in a while. Personally, I didn't like the defaults as far as how they handled screen based features (composting, etc.).

IMO, they should have left that kind of thing disabled by default, as not everyone wants to see those types of "Desktop Effects" (although they may be appealing to a younger generation, I found them to be "over the top".
Hi, Jim. I've liked OpenSuse since 11.1 and I like it even better now. It's rock-solid on my box. If I could run Zoner Photo Studio on it, it would be my full-time OS. Alas, WINE leaves much to be desired and I'm not crazy about working in Virtual Box. I've approached Zoner about a Linux version but they don't seem too warm to the idea.
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Old Dec 10, 2013, 7:28 AM   #4
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Have you tried it on Wine?

One good way to get more software working is by using PlayOnLinux:

http://www.playonlinux.com/en/

When you add a new application, it lets you choose from a lot of different Wine versions, and sets up a Virtual environment just for that app (with it's own unique wine version, windows registry, etc.). It can also download lots of libraries that you may need. When installed, it shows up under Games in your menus.

Personally, I just use Corel AfterShot Pro for raw conversion and basic image enhancements (available for Windows, Linux and OS X):

http://www.corel.com/corel/product/i...id=prod4670071

Here's a webinar that goes into a lot of it's features:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i633ZBya9Fc

P.S.

It's similar to Adobe Lightroom, but does a bit more in some areas. For example, it's got layers with edit regions that lets you do things like make changes to only parts of an image (darken sky without impacting the bottom portion of an image, etc.). It also lets you browse images without importing them into a catalog first (something lightroom doesn't do). But, if you do import them into a catalog, you get more features for searching metadata. Anyway, you can download a trial that works for 30 days without buying it, and if you decide you like it and purchase it, just plug in the license key you'll get (no reinstall necessary).
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Old Dec 10, 2013, 7:58 AM   #5
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Hi, Jim. I've liked OpenSuse since 11.1 and I like it even better now. It's rock-solid on my box.
Have you tried 13.1 yet?

I usually keep a copy of OpenSUSE installed (along with a variety of other distros, as I had 12 partitions setup with 64 Bit Win 7, and multiple linux distros on my [now failed] desktop. But, the last version of OpenSUSE I used for long was 11.3 (but, I install newer versions from time to time to keep it relatively current.

I tend to stick with Debian based distros for day to day work though.

But, OpenSUSE 13.1 got my attention, as it looks like they've finally got btrfs debugged now (and it's snapshot features with the ability to "roll back" changes would be nice to have).

Anyway, I need to take some time to setup a new (actually refurb) PC I just got, as my old PC "bit the dust". My fault (as the video card fan had been making loads of noise for a while, and it apparently seized up overnight (and the motherboard was "scorched" on both sides of the PCIe slot and no longer posts, even with the video card removed trying to use the built in graphics). So, the motherboard (and possibly PSU, too) would need replacing and I decided it was easier just to replace it with a newer model PC.

Oh well.... live and learn (replace the video card fan when it starts to fail, otherwise you may "smoke" your system) :-)

I hate the idea of a PC with Windows 8 on it though (what the refurb shipped with). I spent some time "test driving" Win 8 in VirtualBox and I was not impressed (an understatement). But, I rarely use Windows for anything, so I guess I can live with it.
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Old Dec 10, 2013, 8:38 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Below posts moved from another thread:

Linux Zorin question




Have you installed OpenSUSE 13.1 yet?

I've got a new PC (that came with Win 8 on it), and I'm leaning towards using OpenSUSE 13.1 as it's primary OS (only booting into Windows for testing camera manufacturers' software as needed).

I don't use Windows very often anyway, and bcache was integrated into the Linux kernel beginning with version 3.10, making the latest OpenSUSE a great candidate (since I already have some SSDs I could use for that purpose).

Unlike Intel SRT which only uses an SSD for read cache, or ZFS which only gives you write through cache, bcache can use an SSD for both write through and write-back cache. More about bcache here:

http://bcache.evilpiepirate.org/

That's similar to what Apple markets as their "Fusion" drive, where you get super fast read and write speeds with an SSD married to a physical drive (up until you write more to the SSD than it can stay "caught up" with writing it back to the physical drive).

Since I don't reboot very often, most of what I'd be working on would be an the OS RAM cache anyway, with the SSD containing most of anything else I'd be working on.

It's a block level cache (so it doesn't make any difference what file system you use it with, as you just tie the partitions to the SSD you want to use with bcache).

Of course, I wouldn't get that benefit with Windows (which I'd just leave on the physical hard drive for when I needed it for anything).

But, with LInux (which I use more than 99% of the time, only booting into Win 7 every month or two), it may be a better way to go, and just use the SSD for read and write caching to it with bcache with a distro like OpenSUSE 13.1).

I'm also considering just using Btrfs for default file system with OpenSUSE 13.1.

Yea.. OpenSUSE releases tend to be a bit buggy when first released. But, the latest 13.1 release will have 3 year support via what they refer to as Evergreen, and I'm sure we'll see a lot of updates fixing any remaining bugs soon.

I keep OpenSUSE installed on my desktops anyway (I just haven't installed the latest version of it).

They've also refined and debugged Btrfs significantly from what I've read about it, which offers a lot of benefits (snapshots, etc.) for a file system (very similar to ZFS in it's feature set). So, that kind of more robust file system system combined with bcache for speed improvements is something I'm thinking about implementing.

Anyway, thoughts appreciated.

I usually stick to Debian based distros (although I also keep distros like OpenSUSE and Kubuntu installed in other partitions).

But, given that OpenSUSE (with the latest 13.1 release) seems to be making more progress with newer features like bcache, and newer file systems like btrfs (with built in tools to make disk snapshots easier), I'm thinking about using it as my primary OS instead on my latest PC (still in the box, as I haven't had the time to mess with it yet)

Again, if you have any experience with OpenSUSE 13.1, your thoughts would be appreciated (especially regarding Btfs and snapshot support) as I need to start setting up my new PC soon (just a refurb Dell XPS 8500 with a Core i7 3770 and 12GB of memory, but I have a couple of Samsung 830 SSDs I could use with it to take advantage of the latest bcache support)

Hi, Jim. I've liked OpenSuse since 11.1 and I like it even better now. It's rock-solid on my box. If I could run Zoner Photo Studio on it, it would be my full-time OS. Alas, WINE leaves much to be desired and I'm not crazy about working in Virtual Box. I've approached Zoner about a Linux version but they don't seem too warm to the idea. The initial set-up is always a bit of a PITA what with all the printer/scanner stuff and drive permissions. But, once you get it set up, it's a great OS.
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