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Old Jun 10, 2002, 9:30 PM   #1
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Default Nikon CP 700 + NexStar Telescope = Digiscope?

Ya think it possible to pair a Nikon CP 700 and a NexStar Telescope to make a Digiscope?

Pause....

/tmoy crosses his fingers....and waits in anticipation!
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Old Jun 10, 2002, 9:55 PM   #2
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Default Probably.....

If this is the NexStar 60 refractor with the 1.25" (1 1/4") eyepiece, there is no good reason why it wouldn't work. Do you already have the telescope? If so, then an adapter or eyepiece/adapter and a 24 to 28mm step up ring would be all you would need to get started.

If you have not bought the scope, then I would suggest a larger objective like the Meade ETX-90 - available on the web in spotting scope configuration for about $189. The CP700 isn't the "best" candidate because of its fixed focal length, but you could probably use a little of the digital zoom to help out.

Will it work? I think so. Is it an ideal solution? No....

Best regards,

Lin
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Old Jun 10, 2002, 10:14 PM   #3
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Thanx for the reply...Yeah, already got the telescope (Nature Store in Mall was going out of business, couldn't resist) and the Nikon CP 700 (was my 1st Digicam). I recently purchased a Sony F707 and got sad when looked in the corner of my office and saw the old digicam and telescope collecting dust. Now I have a new project! Anyway...OK, I know I can get the 24 to 28mm setup up ring (piece of cake), but adapter or eyepiece/adapter? I'm not up to speed on this subject, could ya point me in the direction where I could purchase one and how much it would be? Think I could walk into a Wolf/Ritz Camera and pick one up?
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Old Jun 10, 2002, 10:23 PM   #4
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just saw your other posts....william optics here I come....Thanks!
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Old Jun 10, 2002, 11:11 PM   #5
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Default On eyepiece/adapters

Once you have the step-up ring to get to 28mm, you have several choices.

The William Optics 24mm eyepiece has threads on the ocular side (the side you look through) to screw directly to the 28mm filter thread. It was made for the CP series with the 28mm filter threads, but by using the step-up ring, you will have effectively made your CP700 into a 28mm thread, so the eyepiece can attach directly.

It would help to know which eyepiece or eyepieces you have with your telescope. If you have a variable eyepiece, you may want to get an adapter which threads to the 28mm filter ring and then fits over the eyepiece. The most versatile of the present eyepiece adapters are probably made by Eagle Eye - but it's necessary to take a caliper and carefully measure the outside diameter of the eyepiece you have so as to get the properly mated fit.

Since your camera doesn't zoom, there is little advantage in getting the William Optics eyepiece if you have a zoom lens for the scope already...

Here's Eagle Eye's site:

http://www.eagleeyeuk.com

Get me some specifics on your existing eyepiece or eyepieces and maybe we can figure out what would be the best way to proceed.

Best regards,

Lin
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Old Jun 11, 2002, 8:59 PM   #6
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OK...I got 2 Eyepieces...a 1 1/4" MA at 20mm (35X) and 10mm (70X).
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Old Jun 12, 2002, 9:06 AM   #7
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Default Possibilities..

Since you have two eyepieces, you may test for the results you will get by simply holding the camera to each eyepiece and trying a few shots.

The 35x eyepiece (20mm) will get you 1225mm which may be good for birds which you can get reasonably close to. The 70x eyepiece (10mm) will be good for those medium distance shots and will give you 2450mm.

If the vignetting is too severe for cropping the center (too much black around the edges) you may get considerably better results with the William Optics 24mm eyepiece, but remember that it will give you less focal length than your 20mm eyepiece which is only 1225mm.

First try holding the camera to each eyepiece and take a few shots. Let's see where to go from there.

Lin
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Old Jun 12, 2002, 10:03 AM   #8
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hummm...I didn't think of just holding the camera to the eyepiece. I'll give it a try tonight...

OK..the more and more I see photos from digiscopes(recently), the more and more I want one....the bad thing is I dont want to just resurect my old stuff anymore, I want things that dont exist and things I cant afford. I guess I gotta start somewhere.

I took a look at the Meade ETX-90, nice scope. (maybe for christmas or bday, ill have to start working on the wife now!) but also saw the ETX 125...twice the size, and twice the light collection. what do ya think?

also kinda confused...Meade or Orion or other? They all make similar scopes...Whats your take on the Brands?

I'm really starting to get into this...hope ya dont mind me picking your brain. (figure of speach)
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Old Jun 12, 2002, 10:47 AM   #9
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Default Depends...

It all depends on what you want to do with it. If photographing the moon and planets are what primarily interests you, then you really should consider at least a 6" mirror. If you want to photograph birds or terrestrial scenes, then you need frist to consider whether or not you would ever intend to take the scope into the field, or whether it would just be used from a fixed position.

If you intend to take it and a tripod on field trips, then size and weight are definite considerations. Yes, you indeed will get better results with the larger scope. The larger the objective lens, the more light - the more light, the better your overall digiscoping will be.

I'm sort of the opinion that you might consider saving for a different camera first rather than investing in another scope before you have fully exploited the potential of this one. Even a used CP950 would get you 3X zoom which is far more important than the difference between the Meade ETX-90 and 125. With a zoom lens you have greatly extended the flexibility of framing and in essence made a major leap forward.

On the other hand, if celestial photography is going to be the primary use - then definitely the larger objective scope will be superior. Some caution though - for photographing the moon, you will do quite well with what you have. But, if you should decide to photograph the planets or deep space, that's another game altogether. To get even reasonably good images of the planets and stars with any of the current digicams, you need at least a 6" mirror and some specialized software. Because of the requirement for timed exposures, you will need a scope with a motor drive and tracking capabilities. Also because CCD cameras which are not supercooled (specialized cameras for astro-photography) tend to be way noisy on long exposures, the best results are being seen by "stacking" or "blending" multiple photos into one. To do this requires specialized software which corrects overlay of multiple images to the sub-pixel level, and provides capabilities for merging multiple shorter exposure images into a single photo. By doing this, noise levels are reduced appreciably and the software also provides sharpening and other sophisticated photo manipulation algorithms which produce a single image of significantly greater quality than any of those multiple images from which it was derived.

The best I've found for this purpose is a product called "ImagesPlus" which is a dynamite, but highly specialized package priced very reasonably. Here's a link to the author's site where you can see the results of using this product and download a trial version or purchase the software - DEFINITELY worth looking if you have any interest in this... Note! Double click on the moon image on the opening page for a nice inspirational view of what can be done....

Best regards,

Lin

Link to MLUnsold Digital Imaging

[Edited on 6-12-2002 by Lin Evans]
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Old Jun 12, 2002, 12:09 PM   #10
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Good Points...OK...ETX-125 is OUT and ETX-90 is IN.

I intend of photographing terrestrial stuff....and yes I intend on taking it on field trips with tripod in tow.

I guess my immediate goals are to make a digiscope out of what things I currently own then divise an upgrade plan.

Thanks again for all the info...TMOY
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