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Old Mar 28, 2003, 7:12 AM   #1
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Default New shot added to my portifolio

Please view and critique my latest digiscoped shot of Jupiter. If you have time please critique any of my other photo's. I'm using an Olympus C2500-L, a custom machined adapter ring, a 13mm plosal, and a 40mm plossal eyepiece. The scope is a Dynascope RV-6 6" reflector f8. Can someone also assist me with calculating the total focal length in mm for the combinations above? Thanks, and I really enjoy Steve's forums, I have had many questions answered, and all users seem to be very helpfull, and friendly.

Here's the link:
http://www3.photosig.com/viewphoto.php?id=842141

Casey
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Old Apr 2, 2003, 9:29 AM   #2
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Best I can calculate is that your scope is about 1300mm focal length. So with your 13mm eyepiece, you are running about 100X. With the 40mm eyepiece you are running about 32X. Your Jupiter image is a typical shot under average seeing conditions. For best results you have to stack the images with a program like Registax. You need to take as many pictures in a row as your camera will allow in less than 2 minutes. Then stack all those images in Registax. Your planet picture is also too bright to stack. Try to take darker images because the stacking software will brighten them up. You can see my Jupiter and other shots here: http://www.pbase.com/panotaker/astro...raphy&page=all
Ralph

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Old Apr 3, 2003, 6:08 AM   #3
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Ralph,

Your Jupiter shots are real eye-openers. Can I ask what set-up you use ?

You mention that "You need to take as many pictures in a row as your camera will allow in less than 2 minutes. Then stack all those images in Registax". Are you tracking with a motor drive at the same time or does Registax take care of any motion ?

(forgive what is probably a dumb question but I tried some astrophotography about 25 years ago then gave up!).
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 9:35 AM   #4
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For the top picture, I used a Celestron Ultima 2000 8" SCT scope on a tracking mount. I used an 18mm eyepiece in a Digadapt adapter and the camera was a Nikon 5000. For the second picture I used a Televue 85 (3.5 inch scope) with a 5X powermate and the William Optics DCL-28 24mm eyepiece. The scope was mounted on a tracking mount, a Vixen GP/DX. You don't need a tracking mount for planets because you have to crop the picture to use it on Registax. Registax only accepts pictures up to 1024x768. My camera takes the pictures at 2560x1920 with the small planet somewhere in the frame. So I usually crop the pictures to 500x500 and put the planet in the center. You can do it by hand one at a time, but I use a program called Images Plus that crops the planet pictures automatically and puts the planet dead center in each picture. So no, you don't need a tracking mount. Just crop the pictures so that the planet is somewhere in the center and Registax will still find it and align and stack them. For Jupiter you have to take the pictures within 2 minutes because the planet rotates so fast. For the moveable gif, I took 80 pictures every 20 minutes for over an hour. For more info on digital astrophotography, join the digital astrogroup on yahoo: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/digital_astro/
Ralph
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 9:46 AM   #5
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I've got a Leica 3" with a 32WW eyepiece and a 20-60X zoom. My camera is a CP4500 that I use for Wildlife photography. Do you think it would be worth me giving it a try ?
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 10:07 AM   #6
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I take it that your Leica is an APO scope so that would give you an excellent color free jupiter image. All you need is more power. Can you fit a barlow on the end of that scope? And can the scope use regular telescope eyepieces? Do you have a camera adapter for the eyepieces that you have? If you do, then I would get a Televue 5X Powermate barlow. That will multiply the power of your eyepieces by 5 and bring Jupiter to about that same size as my moveable gif. What is the focal length of your scope? My Televue 85 is 600mm focal length, my 8" scope is 2000mm focal length. Divide the focal length of the scope by the eyepiece mm size to give you your power. Multiply that by 5x if you get a powermate. So I think you can get a pretty nice picture of Jupiter if you can increase your power. Just remember that focusing is very dificult especially without a tracking mount.
Ralph
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