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Old Jul 14, 2006, 4:11 PM   #1
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Are smaller lens cameras, and maybe those with 8 megapixels really the best way to go for attaching to scopes to acheive full frame results or can the same be achieved using my rebel or 20 D. I also have a G6.



Any suggestions for the best combinations for any of the above cameras or do I need to purchase one that works better with the scopes?



Thanks,



Rockin
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Old Jul 15, 2006, 7:32 AM   #2
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Lens geometry is usually better with short zoom (3X to 4X) cameras. A camera lens diameter that is not a lot larger than the scope's eyepiece lens also usually produces better results.

We use a Panasonic LX-1. The immage stabalization allows us to hold the camera to the scope with out any mechanical coupling. Eliminating the mechanical coupling between the scope and the camera, besides saving money, allows us to use the scope in the normal way until we see an image we want to record,
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Old Jul 15, 2006, 6:48 PM   #3
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rockin wrote:
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Are smaller lens cameras, and maybe those with 8 megapixels really the best way to go for attaching to scopes to acheive full frame results or can the same be achieved using my rebel or 20 D. I also have a G6.



Any suggestions for the best combinations for any of the above cameras or do I need to purchase one that works better with the scopes?



Thanks,



Rockin
Yes small lens cameras in general are best but not necessarily high resolution. Some of the very best cameras for digiscoping are between 3.34 and 4 megapixel models such as the Nikon CP990 or CP4500.

Your 20D can be used, but is better with a dedicated scope attachment such as the 800mm or 1100mm attachments for the Swarovski spotting scopes.Rarely does anyone get decent results trying to shoot afocal (through the eyepiece) of a scope with a dSLR. Some astronomical scopes such as the Meade ETX-90 or Celestron have ports dedicated to SLR or dSLR cameras where the lens comes off and the camera is attached via the dedicated port and a standard "T" connector. As an example, the Meade ETX-90 has a 1250 mmtube focal length so with the 1.6x crop factor on the 20D you have a 2000mmeffective field of view.

The advantage of the fixed lens digisopes with small lenses amenable to digiscoping (Nikon, Contax, Keyocera, some Canon's, etc.) is that you shoot afocal and the focal lengthsare greatly increased via either the scope's own lens or a dedicated lens. Typically focal lengths of between1200mm and 6000mm areusefull. The other really big advantage is that you have a zoom range rather than the scope acting as a prime lens. The ability to adjust the frame to suit the subject is no small advantage.

The G6 won't make a good candidate for digiscoping - better to find an old CP990 or CP4500 Nikon on Ebay which will do a greatjob.

Best regards,

Lin
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