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Old Feb 13, 2006, 10:41 AM   #1
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Cadillac hood ornament on tile floor. Trying to create a realistic look. Did it work?
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Old Feb 13, 2006, 10:46 AM   #2
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Here's the original photo before masking in Corel PhotoPaint12. Tile floor was photographed in DFW airport...thought I could make use of it somewhere.


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Old Feb 13, 2006, 9:27 PM   #3
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The thing about a diffuse shadow like what you're trying to create is that it is sharper and darker near the object, and gets gradually lighter and fuzzier as it gets farther away.


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Old Feb 13, 2006, 9:30 PM   #4
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You can create the effect by first using the outline of the shape to make a black fill. You'd then distort it to the shape of the shadow to create your basic shadow, cleaning up anything that might appear inconsistent or unrealistic.

Then, duplicate it a few times, and apply a gaussian blur to each duplicate. A little bit to the first one, then gradually more to each additional duplicate.

Then you can blend them together by masking, or using the eraser if you're that confident. The blurrier shadows should have gradually lower opacity as well, to get the fading effect.


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Old Feb 14, 2006, 7:41 AM   #5
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Thanks, Corpsy. But, it depends on the type and strength of the light source as to what kind of shadow is created. I had several options in Corel PhotoPaint 12 for shadows and opted for the lighter one as I thought it went best with the tile floor and subject matter.
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Old Feb 17, 2006, 1:25 PM   #6
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pretty sweet work you have done on the emblems and blending and lining them up so I wont comment on that. The only thing I have issue with is the perspective of the emblem is off a bit in relation to the floor sinc e the floor shot is of a higher perspective and the emblem shot more eye level. If you rotated the emblem in the z plane so the top came forward towards the viewer and the bottom away formt eh viewer it would work a bit better. Or even easier a tile floor shot more eye level akin to the emblem.
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Old Feb 18, 2006, 1:16 PM   #7
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Image editing and painting programs are not designed to calculate the paths of complex light sources and plot their reflections and refractions on 3 dimensional objects within a realistic framework. Without the use of expensive 3D software, and by modeling all the objects in the scene as well, you can't expect the computer to resolve that kind of intricate rendering.

The fact of the matter is, a shadow is not simply a dark spot. That is how an image editing program creates a shadow though, by simply placing a dark spot. It can make it any 2 dimensional shape and apply a varying degree of blur to it, but that's all it is.

The sharpness or softness of a shadow is dependant on the directional nature of the light source. Light from the sun, for instance, is quite uniform and therefore creates very sharp and deep shadows. When it becomes cloudy, light is diffused and multidirectional, creating very dull shadows.

The closer an object is to whatever it is casting a shadow onto, the less room there is for stray light rays to penetrate that space, and therefore the darker and sharper that shadow will be. The farther it is from the object, the more room there is for stray light rays to enter into that space, and therefore the lighter and fuzzier that shadow will become.

Here is an example:


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Old Feb 18, 2006, 1:59 PM   #8
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Corpsy, you said...

When it becomes cloudy, light is diffused and multidirectional, creating very dull shadows.

Obviously, the intensity of the light source determines the type of shadow. I thought that the indoor (tile floor) background, which was away from a strong light source, should cast somewhat muted shadows.
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Old Feb 18, 2006, 7:42 PM   #9
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The intensity has no effect on the kind of shadow cast. You get dull shadows on an overcast day not because the light is dimmer, but because it's coming from many directions, and the farther an object is from where it's shadow is being cast, the more room there is for stray rays of light to get into the shadow area.

On your piece, all the hood ornaments cast a single shadow in one direction, suggesting there is only one light source casting all the visible shadows. If that was the case, the shadows would look very much like the example I posted.

If the scene is meant to have very diffuse light, then the objects would cast a shadow very much the same way a car does on an overcast day, where there's a dark shadow underneath that fades away close to the outside, meaning this particular object would just have a slight, soft shadow going all the way around the perimeter of it's base, and the upper part of the object would cast no visible shadow at all.
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Old Feb 19, 2006, 7:04 AM   #10
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i spotted something that as been missed so far in comments that doesnt look quite right, i think they look ok in perspective and shadows look ok to me, but the thing that really gets my eye is if u look at the front 2 medalion bases then the floor they are at wrong angle, it makes them look to be floating, they dont give impression of sat on the tiles.

now im not too sure how to make it look more convincing so cant suggest anything off top of my head except is u have a tiled floor anywhere try stand something similar on the floor and try get same angle as in pic to see whats wrong



Gary

nice effort though walter
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