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Old Nov 20, 2005, 12:41 PM   #1
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Hi all,

I'm a little bit lost to say the least when it comes to the concept of DyeSub in comparison to the Inkjet and bubblejet technology... So, could someone offer a primer on how the systems are different please..

Thanks in advance.. Just a bit lost
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Old Nov 21, 2005, 10:13 PM   #2
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Inkjet uses ink. The ink is sprayed onto the paper to create your picture. Dye-Sub is thermal and uses a ribbon. The color is burned onto the paper. Quality is pretty close between the two. I'm sure how they compare for longevity.
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Old Nov 22, 2005, 6:11 AM   #3
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dboarder wrote:
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Inkjet uses ink. The ink is sprayed onto the paper to create your picture. Dye-Sub is thermal and uses a ribbon. The color is burned onto the paper. Quality is pretty close between the two. I'm sure how they compare for longevity.
Thanks for that dboarder... I had a feeling it was something like this but I've had a few people talking about InkJet printers as if they were dyesub types..

Cheers..
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Old Dec 23, 2005, 4:37 PM   #4
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Don't forget... most inks are WATER based. Dyes are not, so they won't run if you get the photo wet. Also, some of the dye subs have a UV protection (HiTi for example) that will help delay fading from light.
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Old Dec 27, 2005, 3:40 PM   #5
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solinear wrote:
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Don't forget... most inks are WATER based. Dyes are not, so they won't run if you get the photo wet. Also, some of the dye subs have a UV protection (HiTi for example) that will help delay fading from light.
Hmm.. this is where the confusion lies...

I am aware of these three labels.

dyebase - water based ink as has pretty much been used by most inkjets. Water based means they are soluble and prone to running/spoiling when in contact with water.

pigment - pigment based inks that can use water but in the case of Epson, tend to use a water fast solvent, so don't run.

dyesub(limation) - This other technology which is so similar to the first category that people like yourself shorten it to "Dye", "Dyes", etc... and thus confuse the heck out of people like myself...



For what it's worth I've since come across a few other products in the past month or so that claimed to be dye-sublimation inks but useable in an inkjet printer... very expensive inks to be sure but there's yet more confusion as to whether or not the earlier assertion that dyesubs are thermal only...

Frankly I wish that manufacturers and associated products suppliers would use the correct terminology or find something that is less prone to ambiguity through shortening of the labels.


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Old Dec 27, 2005, 3:41 PM   #6
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[delete double post..]
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Old Jan 10, 2006, 6:57 PM   #7
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Here is little more for you to wonder. there is little more diff here. dyesub pixels are created by mixing color so each dot is of color that it represent vs ink jet create color by placing many dots togather and thus creating ilusion of color it should be. for that reason dye sub is continues tone printer and have batter results. that is one reason 300 dpi produce batter pic on dyesub vs 1440 or more on inkjet
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Old Jan 25, 2006, 8:50 AM   #8
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Ok... after a few more hours spent scouring around I've managed to ask an actual ink manufacturer about Dye Sublimation inks and apparently you CAN get inks compatible with piezzo type inkjets (ie: cold injection).

The ink is a special type which will react to heat and form a bond to various other materials such as ceramics, or t-shirts, etc.. by using a heat press to transfer the printed image from a special paper to the material.

The ink was patented though and is subject to a royalty fee which the patent holder apparently pursues vigorously, which explains the high cost of purchase.



Anyway, bottom line, I've found that an Epson inkjet can be converted to use dye-sublimation inks to print to compatible paper... So whilst dboarder was correct in the assertion that it is thermal in nature, it is also available in liquid (inkjet compatible) form but in this instance you wouldn't use it to print off your photos of the holiday in spain

Thanks to everyone who helped...
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Old Jan 25, 2006, 11:21 PM   #9
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Well, you just learn something new everyday on this Forum
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