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Old Oct 5, 2006, 12:45 AM   #1
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A while back, I posted a question on something I had read about. It regarded taking a number of the same photos, and using a particular technique to heighten exposure levels. I learned, from a responder, that the procedure is called 'High Dynamic Range'. Now, I have also learned that there is a photo editing program (Ulead's Photo Impact 10) which offers the ability for one to gain the 'High Dynamic Range' benefits, via the program itself - with just one photo being required. Does anyone use this feature? If so, what do you think of it?

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Old Oct 5, 2006, 1:05 AM   #2
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OK. After a little more searching, I found that I just be wrong about what I had previously thought. I had assumed that the software would treat a single photo, with High Dynamic Range; that there would be no need to shoot a series of like-compositions by which to achieve that desired end result (which, I had thought, was an 'in camera' thing). 'guess I was wrong, though.

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Old Oct 11, 2006, 10:28 AM   #3
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u can in photoshop do what u are wanting to do with just one photo,making a light copy and a darker copy, have done it many times just to make the pics more dynamic, make the adjustmants with levels blend as you would if they where seperate images

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Old Oct 12, 2006, 8:58 AM   #4
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Thanks for the info, Gary.

I have just Photoshop 7, now, but can find nothing about 'High Dynamic Range' in it. I have worked a little with the 'Levels' & 'Curves' adjustment features, but PhotoImpact incorporated those also - as well as the 'High Dynamic Range' addition. If the same type of thing can be performed in Photoshop, then it must be termed somewhat differently. What is it that I would look for, in this program?

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Old Oct 12, 2006, 10:55 AM   #5
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NLAlston wrote:
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What is it that I would look for, in this program?

You wouldn't.

It's only in CS2 I'm afraid.
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 12:56 PM   #6
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nathan u wont find "high dynamic range" in photoshop its a technique process that you do with the images with what photoshop as got there allready, itll work with any version, ill pm u later as i just got in, i allways edit my pics this way now as it does make a fair bit of difference, sometime not so much as others, but allways the better for it

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Old Oct 12, 2006, 8:53 PM   #7
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Thanks Gary (Stevekin, too, for replying).

I look forward to hearing from you.

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Nathan
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 10:53 PM   #8
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Hi, Nathan;

I have been using Photoimpact 10 for a couple years, and is sort of does have the feature you mentioned. You first have to create a profile of your camera by taking several exposures of the same shot, then merging them into a HDR image, and saving the profile. It will then allow you to create a HDR image from one shot. BUT! It is really only simulating HDR. More like using curves and levels. Dark noise can be a problem, and blown highlights stay blown.

A true HDR image is created by taking a minimum of three exposures of the same scene, one to get the dark details, one normal, and one for the highlights. The three are then overlayed and the software merges them to give the best parts of each. (in simple terms)

I have an HDR image of a covered bridge in my Photobucket album Landscapes. In a normal exposure, the shadows under the bridge had no recognizable details, and much of the sky was washed out. ( album can be found im my profile)

brian
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Old Oct 15, 2006, 8:36 PM   #9
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I recently downloaded Photomatix. . . was playing around with it. . a really neat tool to make surreal images.

i was doing a comparison between photoshp CS2 and Photo matix capabilities in producing HDR images. Photomatix wins hands down.

here's a sample of using 3 images and the result i did with a quick tone mapping in Photomatix.

Kinda cool I thought.

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Old Oct 15, 2006, 8:36 PM   #10
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