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Old Jan 2, 2007, 5:44 PM   #1
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I have a question about resolution.
Is there a way, with PSP 8.10, to downsize my digital pictures while increasing ppi?
That's sounds a little confusing I guess.
You see, I used to use Adobe Photo Deluxe on my old computer. The way that program handled resolution seems different that PSP.
In Adobe, according to their tutorial, when resizing a picture to downsize it, it would 'throw out' only some pixels.
So if I had a picture, an 8 x 10 and 180 ppi for example, I could tell Adobe to make my picture 4 x 6 with 200 ppi. and end up with very clear pictures.
In PSP, in the ‘re-size' box, there is the option to resample. Is that what I'm looking for? If so, which setting do I use? I have been using smart size.
My digital camera, at it's finest setting, gives my 180 ppi and I wonder if I can increase that for better print-outs.
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Old Jan 2, 2007, 8:36 PM   #2
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bigbird07 asks: Is there a way, with PSP 8.10, to downsize my digital pictures while increasing ppi?

Off hand, I'd say yes. I've never used PSP, but maybe if we just kick around a few of your comments you can figure out what you have to do.

What you refer to in the above question is often called "Resizing." This is where you change the length/width dimensions of an image without adding or subtracting any pixels. This gives you the results you mention: If you decrease the L/W without changing the number of pixels, the picture borders decrease while the resolution increases. Conversely, if you increase the L/W without changing the number of pixels, the resolution decreases.

Resolution is a relationship between the number of pixels in an image and the L/W dimensions of the image. That's why if you decrease the L/W and leave the pixels alone, the resolution goes up. You still have the same number of pixels crammed into a smaller area, so the ppi (pixels per inch) goes up.

This differs from another term called "Resampling." In resampling, you either add or subtract pixels. "Upsampling" increases the pixel count and "Downsampling" decreases the pixel count.

bigbird continues: I used to use Adobe Photo Deluxe on my old computer. The way that program handled resolution seems different that PSP.
In Adobe, according to their tutorial, when resizing a picture to downsize it, it would 'throw out' only some pixels.
So if I had a picture, an 8 x 10 and 180 ppi for example, I could tell Adobe to make my picture 4 x 6 with 200 ppi. and end up with very clear pictures.


What you have there is resampling. To make it easy, let's say that you wanted to cut the L/W of your 8 x10
in half to 4 x 5. If you just resized (leaving the pixel count alone), you'd end up with a 4 x 5 at 360 ppi! That's more resolution that can be meaningfully reproduced by even a photo-quality printer, so a good idea would be to downsample the image (throw out pixels) to no more than 300ppi, which is the upper limit beyond which no more visual detail can be added. That's why Photo Deluxe dumped some of your pixels, though you told it to set the ppi at 200, so it threw out more than if you had specified 300ppi.

bigbird goes on: In PSP, in the ‘re-size' box, there is the option to resample. Is that what I'm looking for? If so, which setting do I use?

To retain maximum image quality, you want to avoid resampling as much as possible. Downsampling is not as damaging as upsampling since a downsampled image still is made up of only original pixels while in an upsampled image, the computer has to literally guess what kind of pixel should go where and then make it!

As to what ppi settings to shoot for, just keep in mind that 300ppi is the widely accepted upper limit beyond which you're just wasting ink and 72ppi is an acceptable lower limit. (For monitor display -- like web posting. 72ppi will make a lousy standard print.)
Many people find they can get fairly good prints at 150ppi and are comfortable using 240ppi as an upper limit. You should play around with your equipment and see what looks good to you.

bigbird concludes: My digital camera, at it's finest setting, gives my 180 ppi and I wonder if I can increase that for better print-outs.

Actually, your camera doesn't determine the ppi. Files from your camera might open up in your editor at a default resolution of 180ppi -- it has to open up at some resolution setting -- but if you are shooting at full image size and maximum quality, there's nothing more you can do with your camera.
The resolution setting of a particular image doesn't really mean anything until you print. Then, the resolution tells the printer how far apart to print the pixels.

I hope some of this gives you a handle on how to approach this issue in the editor you're using.

Grant
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Old Jan 3, 2007, 9:26 AM   #3
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Grant,

Thank You so much for the time you spent on that reply. You explained it so well andI understand perfectly now.

I shall save your post and add it to my binder of helpful hints. Now I have the knowledge I need to do some experimenting with PSP.

Have a great day.

-Judy


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