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Old Feb 28, 2007, 8:24 PM   #1
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:? Thought you guys would have the answer. I presently use a 17" flat screen monitor. I wondered how much better a larger screen would be for optimizing photo retuching and adjustment work. My screen gets pretty small and hard to see for these older eyes with all the stuff going on in CS2.

Thanks in advance for your input.
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Old Feb 28, 2007, 10:59 PM   #2
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I still use a 15" CRT, and was having some difficulties as well. After a visit to my optometrist and some new prescription lenses, I am doing just fine. The distance you view the monitor is different from reading distance, and that needs to be taken into account.

brian
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Old Mar 2, 2007, 8:17 AM   #3
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Well said brian. Just got new peepers from the eye doc and they work very handily. I am just realizing that a larger screen might allow me to view detail better as I edit photos.

Since writhing this first question, I searched a coupe other forums and the optimal size seems to be 22-24". Some are using double monitors with the controls on one screen and the photo on the other. Don't know how they do that yet.

You may be among those luck ones with great eyes as my 17" seems croweded when I opem CS2 and get a few activities on the screen.

Thanks for your reply, brian, best wishes.
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 8:34 PM   #4
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I GOT A 21". FOR ONLY HAVING ONE GGOD EYE IT IS A BIG HELP.
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Old Mar 13, 2007, 3:16 AM   #5
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Golfer wrote:
Quote:
Well said brian. Just got new peepers from the eye doc and they work very handily. I am just realizing that a larger screen might allow me to view detail better as I edit photos.

Since writhing this first question, I searched a coupe other forums and the optimal size seems to be 22-24". Some are using double monitors with the controls on one screen and the photo on the other. Don't know how they do that yet.

You may be among those luck ones with great eyes as my 17" seems croweded when I opem CS2 and get a few activities on the screen.

Thanks for your reply, brian, best wishes.
Seems to be a rather common concern for those of us with older eyes. I recently had an eye exam with a good health report on my eyes. Prescription changes were slight yet the lenses were ground incorrectly. New ones are now ready for me to try for round two.

During my review with the Ophthalmologist, who happens to be a digital photo buff, I gleaned some of his thoughts on minimizing eye fatigue and enhancing the enjoyment of digital photography. Some I had already implemented though others not.

He suggested nightly cleaning of the lower eye lids with baby shampoo. Start using eye drops regularly. These have already helped. My new lenses "progressive type" have been prescribed to accentuate the monitor distance more than the reading. Using a hood with my monitor. Spending the time to find and purchase a better graphics card. Upgrade the monitor to match the quality of the card while getting above 19" viewing area. Using a Wacom (already using one and find it much easier when working in PS).

Besides the Wacom I now use, I switched my room lighting to achieve nearly a 6500 Kelvin environment, purchased and use a LaCie Blue Eye 2 to build my profiles. My latest is in-progress now; repainting my digital dark room using a very neutral grey flat finish.

Though the above may seem to some/many as overkill, my hobby and my eyes are both very important to me. I still need to get the video card and monitor, and the later would mean a new hood since mine won't fit the larger one. All-in-all I have already seen some improvement through the adjustments made, though my prints, as one would expect, look quite different outside of my digital darkroom.:roll:
Best,
Steve
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Old Mar 16, 2007, 10:35 AM   #6
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BrierS: Been away for awhile and just caught up with your reply. Thanks much for sharing. You advice is really good, I just got the same type eyewear you have [works very well] and just ordered a Dell 24" LCD screen.

I was kind of confused by your statement of washing the lower eyelid with baby shampoo. Could you enlarge on that for me. Also, is the purpose of the cover on the screen to reduce glare?

Thanks again
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Old Mar 16, 2007, 9:10 PM   #7
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Good evening Golfer. The baby shampoo is for aging folks like me (52). The lower eye lids don't produce fluids enough to keep the cleaning process going. My doc told me the procedure would reduce eye fatigue, especially when viewing the monitor as much as I do. Works great.

Yes on the hood. It reduces the influencing affects from other lighting sources once the monitor is calibrated.

24" should be a joy to work with!!!

Fun isn't it?

Best,
Steve
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 9:26 AM   #8
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Very intrigued by the baby shampoo technique but still a little confused on the details.

Do you wash the inside, outside or both of the lower eyelid? How is this done? I assume using something like cotton wool.

Phil
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 3:25 PM   #9
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Just a little baby shampoo on a warm, wet face cloth. Holding the lower eye lid downwards, just wash/massage the inner portion of the lower lids. Really makes a difference for those of us advancing in age (tear ducts don't do their job the way they used to).
Best,
Steve
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Old Mar 26, 2007, 5:30 AM   #10
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Baby shampoo ?
Not heard of that one but I'm willing to try :-)

Word of warning to those that have not done this.....make sure it is baby shampoo. Then it won't sting
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