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Old May 11, 2007, 2:00 PM   #1
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On my recent visit to the camera store, the salesperson was sharing info, with me, on a nifty thing that could be done in Photoshop (or practically any photo editing program) - using a solid blue, or gray, backdrop. She said that there was a process by which a blue (preferably), or gray background could easily be selected & changed to an entirely different color, or other background. She had talked a little more on it, but I just cannot remember what else she had said. At any rate, I went out and purchased a couple yards of blue, and gray fabric. Now I just need to learn that process (I have Photoshop 7).

Blessings,
Nathan
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Old May 11, 2007, 8:45 PM   #2
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The process is known as "chroma keying", or "bluescreening" or "greenscreening"

Here is a YouTube video on the most basic technique.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAF9GFBTaAo

There are also manyplugins that can do the same, such as Primatte Chromakeyor FluidMask.


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Old May 11, 2007, 10:59 PM   #3
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Man that video went about it the hard way.

Frist of all do you have photoshop or photoshop elements?

Second do you want to change the color of the background or replace it completely?


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Old May 12, 2007, 1:59 AM   #4
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Hi ~ and thanks for responding.

I have Photoshop 7, and the answer to your second question is - both. Right now, I wish to try my hand at just changing the background's color, but would also like to learn how to replace the background completely. I have PHOTOSHOP For Windows & Macintosh (my computer is Windows based), by Elaine Weinman & Peter Lourekas, but didn't know what to look for - nor was I fortunate enough to 'happen' across it. Any guidance, in this, would REALLY be appreciated.

Blessings,
Nathan




tjsnaps wrote:
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Man that video went about it the hard way.

Frist of all do you have photoshop or photoshop elements?

Second do you want to change the color of the background or replace it completely?

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Old May 12, 2007, 8:38 AM   #5
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I guess that I may be out of luck. I had been told that the capability was indeed within my version of Photoshop (v7), but it apparently is not. I did watch that 'You-Tube' tutorial, but it is something totally different from what that salesperson had described. But at least it is a way by which to try my hand at this. Those two Plug-ins (Primatte Chromakey & Fluidmask) are out of pocket-range for me, right now, so we'll see what happens with what I've got :-).

Blessings,
Nathan
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Old May 12, 2007, 12:41 PM   #6
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as shown in the video easy way when its a same colour background its to use magic wand to click on the colour and adjust it till it gets most of it then delete

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"other harder way is to cut round the subject, inverse the selection and delete

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"its a pretty basic thing that "ANY" version of photoshop can do but it takes time effort and skill to do it so it looks convincing

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"a good way to just change a colour of an item is to make a new layer, change blend mode to hue and just paint over with what ever colour u like

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Gary
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Old May 12, 2007, 3:23 PM   #7
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Thanks Gary,

I'll give those a shot.
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Old May 12, 2007, 5:00 PM   #8
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OK

To change color of back ground
Make a new layer. Fill the entire layer with the color you want and set the blending mode to "color"
Now turn that layer off and select the background layer (your picture).
Use the magic want tool to select the background. Add to the selection by holding the shift key while clicking subtract from the selection by holding the alt key.
You can undo at any point.
If you find that you are selecting part of the subject try lowering the tolerance in the tool pallet.
Now go back to your color layer. Turn it back on and click the "add layer mask" button on the bottom of the layer pallet.
Use the Gaussian blurs to soften the edges of the mask.
With this method you can change the color at will by filling the color layer with a new color. Try using the gradient fill tool for cool effects.
You can use this method to replace the back ground as well (where the color layer is the background layer) But I prefer another way

To replace the background
Right click your image in the layer pallet and chick "Layer from Background"
Now past in your background layer and drag it to the bottom
Go back to the top layer and select the background the same way as described above.
While still on the top layer. Invert the selection and click "add layer mask"
Soften your mask with Gaussian blur.

Adjusting mask
The great part about using mask in they don't delete pixel the just hide them. So if you should accidentally take a chunk you of your subjects head it easy to get it back.
You can fine tune you mask by painting on them. With a soft brush.
Black hides pixels white reveals them.
Gray is semi transparent. (or better yet lower the opacity of the brush) this will help around fly away hair.
The smug tool is great for difficult areas.
The Gaussian blur should be saved for last and be careful not to over do it as it will cause a halo to appear around your subject.

A graphics tablet will be very helpfull with all this

remember to make sure you are working on the mack not the image by selecting it in the layer pallet
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Old May 13, 2007, 6:51 PM   #9
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I use a technique similar to TJSnaps but I don't use the magic wand tool. I prefer to use the color range selection tool because it encompasses the entire image at once so you can more easily get all of a certain color, even if it's behind a chain link fence.

Also, the magic wand either selects something or doesn't and will have a jagged edge, which is why you then have to apply blur. The color range selector selects pixels by how close they are to the color you select, so if you select blue and a pixel is almost blue, it will be partially selected (and partially transparent), giving you a much softer and more accurate selection.

Here's a post where I show step by step how I isolate someone from a background. I used the color range selector in a somewhat different way than I would if it was a solid color background, but this was more complicated than a typical extraction.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...726160#p726160
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