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Old Apr 22, 2009, 7:59 AM   #1
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Is there any way of stripping the exif information from RAW files?

Thanks in advance for any info

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Old Apr 22, 2009, 8:06 AM   #2
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Why?

You could probably find a way to strip it out (for example, using a hex editor or writing a quick program). However, you may not be able to convert the files. ;-)

RAW converters are probably going to need that information in order to process the image properly (looking at camera model, etc.). Keep in mind that raw files are different between camera models, even when they're using the same extension (.nef, .crw, cr2, etc.). So, a raw converter needs to know information about the camera being used to convert the images into a usable (i.e., viewable) format like jpeg, tiff, etc.. Most raw converters can also use information like the as shot white balance (applying the same RGB multipliers to the image that the camera would have used for processing), reducing the time it takes to get the colors right if you set WB in advance.

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Old Apr 22, 2009, 7:25 PM   #3
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Hi Jim

"why", good question. Perhaps I should have explained first.
I realise that the exif is very important to most RAW converters. I have this shot that I shot in RAW(long before I had heard of such things)that becries for some such processing(at least from what I understand of HDR). InPS Raw, I have made copies of this shot, one +2 and one -2, but when I use PS's merge to HDR, it looks the same as the original.
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Old Apr 22, 2009, 8:32 PM   #4
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With most raw converters, you don't actually change anything in the raw file when you make adjustments, until the image is converted to another format.

Instead, raw converters are just keeping track of the changes you make (sometimes in separate files) when you save changes (then reapplying those changes to the same raw data when you open it again). IOW, the image portion of the raw file isn't actually changing.

I haven't used the Photoshop HDR merge feature. So, I don't know what it's expecting. You'll probably need to convert the raw file into multiple editable files (like tiff) before using that kind of merge (that way, you've got tiff files converted at multiple exposure levels for the merge).

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Old Apr 22, 2009, 8:45 PM   #5
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Thanks for the information Jim

JimC wrote:
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I haven't used the Photoshop HDR merge feature. So, I don't know what it's expecting. You'll probably need to convert the raw file into multiple editable files (like tiff) before using that kind of merge (that way, you've got tiff files converted at multiple exposure levels for the merge).
That I just tried actually, I wasnt pleased at all with the results. I guess I will just have to wait for a decent day,weather wise, and get a new shot, using AEB, and try it again.
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Old Apr 22, 2009, 8:50 PM   #6
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I have heard a number of people attempt to process a single shot different ways to get HDR-like results, with varying results. I have not had anything approaching satisfactory results doing this.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"My approach, when I need the increased dynamic range, and only have a single exposure to work from, is to use Raw Therapee to do the conversion. Using the exposure curves, combined with the highlight recovery capabilities has been very worthwhile. If your original shot isn't too over-or-under exposed, it should give you acceptable results. (and it's free)

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"brian
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