Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Software > Editors (Photoshop, Vegas, Final Cut Pro, Kdenlive, etc.)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 1, 2009, 12:55 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 25
Default Cuda acceleration in Windows Media Player

Hi all, this is my first ever post so be nice!

I wanted to let fellow-users know of my current software setup which can produce hardware-accelerated x264 playback within Windows Media Player.

First of all you need to get the Vista/Win7 Code package, this is free and availabe here: http://shark007.net/index.html . It will enable the playback of all your multimedia files within Windows Media Player, no need for seperate third-party players, Media Player will be able to play everything. Best codec package in my opinion. The Vista pack is also compatible with XP. Uninstall any other codec pack that you may have already installed, reboot and install it. During installation you may get an antivirus warning, this is definitely a false positive. I've been using it for a long time and it is definitely clean, but goggle for this issue beforehand for your own peace of mind (I did too!). Here's a quick link to Softpedia's article that confirms that this is a false positive: http://www.softpedia.com/get/Multime...-Package.shtml. Don't forget to get the x64 Components add-on too if your OS is 64bit, but install that one AFTER the Vista/Win7 pack.

You can then use mkvmerge to convert any mp4, mov, or avi x264 file to the mkv (Matroska) container format without any loss of quality. It's also free and you can get it here http://www.bunkus.org/videotools/mkv...s.html#windows . Conversion to mkv is fast as there is no re-encoding taking place. mkvmerge can also split your video files into multiple smaller parts. There is a definite advantage to mkv conversion if you are an nVidia user with a new-ish card (anything above the 6 series) and recent nVidia drivers: With the right codec combination your mkv files will play within Windows Media Player, (and also Media Player Classic), and with nVidia Cuda hardware acceleration enabled. Cuda will take a lot of the HD playback load off the CPU, and this will result to smoother playback especially with older systems.

In order to get the Cuda playback going with mkv files in Media Player you'll also need the CoreAVC codec which is not free, but you can get a trial at http://coreavc.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=41&Itemi d=59
Just make sure you install CoreAVC first before installing the Vista/Win7 Codec pack. Do a custom CoreAVC installation and deselect the Haali splitter component, this must be done because the Vista/Win7 pack (which you will be installing next) already contains a newer version of the Haali splitter than the one included within the CoreAVC package. After all is installed, open the Vista/Win7 codec pack settings (you have to right-click on its shortcut and run it as Administrator) and under the H264 tab select "Use CoreAVC codec". Click the "configure" button next to it and the CoreAVC properties page will come up. Make sure you place ticks at the three boxes at the bottom right of the window (Preferred decoder, Use Tray Icon, Prefer Cuda Aceleration). Leave the rest at defaults and click OK to close it, and Exit to close the Vista/Win7 pack properties. Now it's all done. If you play an mkv file you'll see the Cuda icon coming up on the taskbar, indicating that Cuda is enabled.

If you use Media Player Classic make sure you go to its options and disable all its internal codecs after installation of the Codec Pack. There is also an option there to make CoreAVC the preffered decoder in MPC.

Apologies if any of this has been covered already within this forum, I just signed up today and haven't had the chance to look around yet!

Last edited by =Alex=; Dec 20, 2009 at 10:49 PM.
=Alex= is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 1, 2009, 1:24 PM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by =Alex= View Post
Hi all, this is my first ever post so be nice!
I'll try. ;-)

But, I ban multiple members almost *every* day that join the forums with tutorials on video playback software (since it appears that they're joining for the sole purpose of promoting commercial software, and we do not allow advertising in our forums). When someone's very first post is linking to a commercial product (as in the case of CoreAVC), it does arouse suspicions. ;-)

But, since your IP Address, member name and e-mail address do not appear to be associated with known spammers, I'll assume that you're just posting this to help others. However, you may want to be careful posting this in other forums immediately after joining them, as it could arouse suspicions and get you banned (with your IP address, e-mail address and more added to spammer databases used by many forums). There are a *lot* of spammers promoting commercial video playback and/or conversion software now. ;-)

So, Welcome to the Forums!

The CoreAVC codecs do look interesting, as there is a current project underway to port them to Linux (under an open source versus commercial license).

http://code.google.com/p/coreavc-for-linux/

Personally, I stick to VLC for most video playback needs (it's free and cross platform).

http://www.videolan.org/

I try to *never* use Windows Media Player (even if that's the only solution for a given format). I'd rather not watch something that requires it.

But, some of our members may be interested in your findings, as applications making use of GPU acceleration are very interesting. Personally, I think OpenCL is probably going to be the solution of choice for most similar projects going forward, as it's not proprietary to Nvidia like CUDA. But, only time will tell how well these types of solutions are accepted.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2009, 2:34 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 25
Default

Thank you for you comments JimC, I wasn't aware that my post could be seen as "commercial" until you mentioned it of course. You are right, poor thinking on my part. No, I don't work for anyone mentioned at my previous post, I'm just a regular guy from London, UK with a passion for HD gadgets.

In my view a lot of commercialy available editing software are rubbish anyway apart from a few exceptions. In most cases a user can find open-source/freeware applications which an do an equal if not better job than the commercial stuff.

BTW, why do you dislike WMP so much? With the Shark007 codecs it actually works quite well. The only negative thing I can think of is possible privacy issues and potential info being sent to MS, but all that can be easily be blocked with a firewall. VLC is great, I've used it myself, I just like the look and feel of WMP better.

Last edited by =Alex=; Dec 1, 2009 at 2:47 PM.
=Alex= is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2009, 2:57 PM   #4
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by =Alex= View Post
BTW, why do you dislike WMP so much? With the Shark007 codecs it actually works quite well. The only negative thing I can think of is possible privacy issues and potential info being sent to MS, but all that can be easily be blocked with a firewall. VLC is great, I've used it myself, I just like the look and feel of WMP better.
Exactly (privacy issues), and yes, when I use Windows, I do use a firewall that monitors software that tries to "phone home". I had an experience with Windows Media Player a while back that I really didn't like, and I've tried not to use it since. But, in fairness, I'm not a huge MS fan (at least not anymore). I run Linux most of the time unless I really need something that won't run under it (or run in Wine).
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2009, 3:23 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 25
Default

I use Ubuntu on one of my laptops and it's great. I don't like Microsoft either, but I have to admit, Win7 looks great on my 40' Samsung HD TV... Also we have to remember that a lot of novice users have no choice, they buy a PC with Windows pre-installed and will most probably use WMP for their playback needs. This was one of the main reasons I wrote this little guide in plain English concentrating on what most new users will already have and are most likely to use.

When I was an absolute n00b I was frequently trying to find software guides that were not technically daunting, and it was hard. It's easy for a new user to get lost trying to find solutions within extended tutorials, written by expert users, and full of incomprehensible jargon. Now that I'm a more seasoned n00b I can at least try to give something back, hopefully in a way that a total beginner can understand and can get results with!

Last edited by =Alex=; Dec 1, 2009 at 3:43 PM.
=Alex= is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2009, 3:45 PM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Ubuntu is very popular. You may also want to give Mint a try. A new release came out a few days ago. You'll see a download link in the press release about it at distrowatch.com:

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05795

It uses an Ubuntu 9.10 base (you can install software from the Ubuntu repos), and it's very beginner friendly (with a super nice menu system, loads of preinstalled codecs, etc.).

I'm mostly a Debian Fan (and I've got multiple Linux distros installed that use a Debian base, including SimplyMEPIS, Sidux, and others). But, I'll have to admit that Mint 8 is a pretty nice distro, even though I've never been a big fan of Ubuntu based distros.

Here's a new review of Mint 8:

http://linuxcritic.com/stories/43-Li...ommentary.html

My wife uses SimplyMEPIS 8 on her laptop (which uses a Debian base with KDE 3.5.10). But, I'm considering switching her over to Mint 8 instead I'm so impressed with it's ease of use.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2009, 3:50 PM   #7
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

P.S.

Don't tell anyone, but I'm using OpenSUSE 11.2 right this minute (I've been running it for the past week or so). ;-)

But, frankly, I'm not very impressed (and I haven't been very impressed with their previous efforts either). I just wanted to get a "feel" for how it's progressing with the latest 11.2 version, and it needs more work (IMO anyway).
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2009, 4:02 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 25
Default

Thank you for the links and the advice Jim, I will definitely give Mint 8 a try. I'll probably run the distro from a bootable disc, I find it's faster that way rather than VMing it. BTW, have you ever tried to boot a distro from a USB drive? Can you point me to any good links on the subject?

PS. Don't worry, your "secret" is safe with me...

Last edited by =Alex=; Dec 1, 2009 at 4:14 PM.
=Alex= is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:36 AM.