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Old Mar 22, 2010, 7:32 AM   #1
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Default Freeware AVCHD Editor?

Anyone know the location of a Freeware Avchd Editor? I have PhotofunStudio that came with my FZ35, but it Sucks Big Time.
I know I'm going out on a broke limb here, but something with titles, and some effects would be great.

For you guys that may be looking for something like this yourself. I do know of a Program the Rivals Sony Vegas Pro. Full Featured 100% Free. But I just do'nt really want to use it. It's Called "kdenlive" made for Linux, but there is a tutorial on youtube, this Chick shows how to install it as a image on a thumb drive and it will boot in Windows and work.

I'm just a hair Lazy and would like something more simple. I love Cyberlink Power Director 8 Ultra. But it's out of my budget for a While.

Here is the link for Kdenlive.
http://www.kdenlive.org/user-manual/...or-usb-storage

You can install it to a DVD, or a USB thumb drive.
And you can lookup Nixiepixel on youtube she will show you how to install it. Heck I may give it a try myself.

Here is the image writer it will write the image to a usb thumb drive.
https://launchpad.net/win32-image-writer

Last edited by MeGaPixEliT; Mar 22, 2010 at 8:29 AM.
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 7:56 AM   #2
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There are a number of video editors available for Linux. The Kdenlive program you mentioned is one of the more popular ones lately.

http://www.kdenlive.org/

Another up and coming editor is OpenShot:

http://www.openshotvideo.com/

But, I don't think they have Windows versions available. You may want to consider installing Linux in a dual boot config with Windows. That way, you can boot into it and use some of the more popular programs available for Linux (since running them from a flash drive or CD is going to be slow, a hard drive install is the best way to go).

Basically, you just shrink (resize it smaller if you have unused space) your NTFS partition with Windows on it to make room for Linux partitions on your hard drive (a few GB is all most need, but I'd probably give one around 10GB for future growth), and most can install easily so that you have a boot menu choice each time you restart your PC (just select Linux or Windows as desired). Since modern distros can read and write to NTFS, you can still keep all of your files on your Windows partition.

I'd probably look at Mint 8 for starters. It's a very easy to use Linux distro with many programs preinstalled (and thousands more available with a mouse click or two):

Here's a review:

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/l...nt-helena.html

You can download it from the link in this press release (click on the .iso file):

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05795

Just burn the .iso file to CD, reboot your PC into it, and it can run from CD. If you like it, make room on your hard drive for it (shrinking your Windows partition using Windows Disk management if you are using Vista or Win 7, or using the partition manager on the Linux CD to do it if you're using XP). Then, it can use that free space to create Linux partitions and install to your drive in a dual boot config (you'll see an install icon on the live cd desktop).

I don't keep up with video editors for Windows. But, some of our other members may chime in with suggestions.
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:00 AM   #3
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P.S.

It looks like Avidemux has a Windows version. I don't know how well it handles AVCHD. But, may want to give it a try:

http://fixounet.free.fr/avidemux/
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:31 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
There are a number of video editors available for Linux. The Kdenlive program you mentioned is one of the more popular ones lately.

http://www.kdenlive.org/

Another up and coming editor is OpenShot:

http://www.openshotvideo.com/

But, I don't think they have Windows versions available. You may want to consider installing Linux in a dual boot config with Windows. That way, you can boot into it and use some of the more popular programs available for Linux (since running them from a flash drive or CD is going to be slow, a hard drive install is the best way to go).

Basically, you just shrink (resize it smaller if you have unused space) your NTFS partition with Windows on it to make room for Linux partitions on your hard drive (a few GB is all most need, but I'd probably give one around 10GB for future growth), and most can install easily so that you have a boot menu choice each time you restart your PC (just select Linux or Windows as desired). Since modern distros can read and write to NTFS, you can still keep all of your files on your Windows partition.

I'd probably look at Mint 8 for starters. It's a very easy to use Linux distro with many programs preinstalled (and thousands more available with a mouse click or two):

Here's a review:

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/l...nt-helena.html

You can download it from the link in this press release (click on the .iso file):

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05795

Just burn the .iso file to CD, reboot your PC into it, and it can run from CD. If you like it, make room on your hard drive for it (shrinking your Windows partition using Windows Disk management if you are using Vista or Win 7, or using the partition manager on the Linux CD to do it if you're using XP). Then, it can use that free space to create Linux partitions and install to your drive in a dual boot config (you'll see an install icon on the live cd desktop).

I don't keep up with video editors for Windows. But, some of our other members may chime in with suggestions.

It works on Windows windows 2000, XP, Vista, ect. Linux OS not needed. You can boot from the thumb drive in windows right into kdenlive on the thumb drive. Or you can burn Kdenlive right to a DVD, and boot from it. From your windows based pc.
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:36 AM   #5
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The image you burn to a thumb drive or CD is Linux. Basically, they're using a Debian based Live Linux distro with Kdenlive preinstalled.

Most Linux distros can run from CD or flash drives without installing them. But, they're slow that way (due to the speed of the CD or flash drive, decompressing files from it "on the fly", etc.). Installing them to a hard drive in a dual boot config with Windows is a much better way to go, allowing you to boot into a full featured linux distro with lots of programs on it (Firefox, OpenOffice, image editors, etc.), with thousands more available with a mouse click or two, with far better performance than you have trying to run one from a flash drive or CD.
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:46 AM   #6
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IOW, when you boot into the Kdenlive image you install to CD or flash drive, you're booting into a Linux operating system (they use a Debian live linux distribution with their images you burn to media to use it).

But, they probably don't have drivers for a lot of hardware included, and probably don't include a lot of codecs or other programs. It's just a way to let you use Kdenlive without installing it to your hard drive.
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 9:12 AM   #7
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Looking at their download page, it does look like they include quite a bit in their download, including a few other Linux applications like Blender and Audacity. It's using a 2.6.30 Linux Kernel with a Gnome desktop and has drivers included for ATI and Nvidia graphics cards (which is unusual for a Linux distro, since those are not open source).

It also has a partition manager on it so you can resize your Windows partition and install it to hard drive if desired using the Debian Linux installer (you'll see a link to a page with screen shots of how to do that near the bottom of it's download page):

http://www.kdenlive.org/user-manual/...or-usb-storage

IOW, once you boot into it (either on a flash drive or a DVD), you're not using Windows at all (as you're booting into a Linux operating system). It can just read and write to your Windows partition on your hard drive.

You can also set it up with what is known as a "persistent" install if you use a USB flash drive. Basically, that allows you to install additional software from the Debian linux repositories or make changes to your configuration, saving them on the USB Drive without a need to install it to your hard drive if you don't want to. You'll see a link to screen shots showing you how to do that on the bottom of the download page.

It's Debian based (which has a great reputation for stability), but I don't know if it's using Debian stable, testing, or experimental. Chances are, it's using the Debian stable release (which is OK, but doesn't have newer versions of many linux programs in it's repositories). From the notes I see on the download page, it also doesn't support the newest version of Kdenlive due to a Debian packaging issue (they're using an older one on the Linux Live image you boot into, probably because it's Debian stable and doesn't support the latest versions of many software packages the way some of the newer Linux distros do).

I'd try it and see what you think. Just keep in mind that Linux is only the underlying kernel. So the desktop, look and feel and much more varies a lot between different Linux distributions (there are thousands to choose from). Mint 8 (mentioned in my first post to this thread), is a very good one for Linux newbies. It's very full featured and quite easy to use.
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 11:08 AM   #8
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It works great. Boot into Dabian, run Kdenlive, browse windows (my documents) But could not get Kdenlive to see my M2TS files. I know it can, I just missed a step or something. Wow this works great, and I even used Dabian to browse the net, and it has a lot of cool features. So easy to install on my 8GB stick.
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 11:09 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
The image you burn to a thumb drive or CD is Linux. Basically, they're using a Debian based Live Linux distro with Kdenlive preinstalled.

Most Linux distros can run from CD or flash drives without installing them. But, they're slow that way (due to the speed of the CD or flash drive, decompressing files from it "on the fly", etc.). Installing them to a hard drive in a dual boot config with Windows is a much better way to go, allowing you to boot into a full featured linux distro with lots of programs on it (Firefox, OpenOffice, image editors, etc.), with thousands more available with a mouse click or two, with far better performance than you have trying to run one from a flash drive or CD.
Can I get my preinstalled O.S to dual boot with my stick? and Debian?
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Old Mar 22, 2010, 11:16 AM   #10
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Yep.. Lots of Linux distros can be installed that way (on a USB stick). You've got *thousands* of different distros to choose from, with a variety of different desktops (Gnome like that Kdenlive image is using, different versions of KDE, which is a different desktop, LXDE, and many more). Ditto for themes, applications included, utilities for helping you to configure things, etc. Linux is only the underlying kernel. So, you can't really judge one by another. ;-)

One site that tracks many of them is http://www.distrowatch.com

An easy way to test drive distros from a USB Stick is by using Unetbootin:

http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

Basically, you can download the .iso file for a given Linux distro (like the link in the Mint 8 press release I referred you to in my first post to this thread), point that tool to it and it will setup a USB stick for you (which you'll need to preformat as FAT32 first, then it will do the rest).

I'd try some like the Mint 8 distro I mentioned in my first post to see what you think, test driving a few to get a better idea of how they differ before installing one to your hard drive in a dual boot config with windows (so you can pick the operating system you want to use at bootup time via a menu choice). Even though many distros can work as a "Live" distro without installing them, they run much faster from a hard drive installation. ;-)
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