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Old Dec 16, 2010, 7:02 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
when i need a bit more in depth info, one of the places i go is
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials.htm
That's the site that convinced me to buy my 5D years ago. It has wonderful images of Cambridge on it.
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Old Dec 17, 2010, 7:48 AM   #22
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Oh, by the way - if an image does not have an imbeded color profile it will just apply whatever color space your software package is using. If you're using CS4 for jpegs, somewhere in the setup of CS you indicate what color space to use. Just look there and make sure it's srgb instead of Adobe so you'll see the colors as they will print.
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Old Dec 17, 2010, 3:15 PM   #23
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Even after I've opened my images in Photoshop and made contrast adjustments, Color space still shows as Uncalibrated in the properties window !

And now that I've transferred those photos into the Photo Book folder, they've become Read-Only, so I can't do a batch Color Space conversion anymore !

Oh Lord, I just hope they won't look too bad on print ! :sad-face:

Can I say the F word, to ease off the frustration ?

It's going to be torturous waiting for the printing results... o_0
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Old Dec 17, 2010, 3:17 PM   #24
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sure. i said it once before too.
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Old Dec 17, 2010, 3:39 PM   #25
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Even after I've opened my images in Photoshop and made contrast adjustments, Color space still shows as Uncalibrated in the properties window !
That's not necessarily a problem. The question is: what is your photoshop set to. I have an older version. But in the older version if you just open up photoshop without opening a photo, go to EDIT > COLOR SETTINGS menu options and it will display a dialog that specifies WORKING SPACES and COLOR MANAGEMENT PROFILES. The question is - what working space is your photoshop set to - sRGB or Adobe?
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Old Dec 17, 2010, 5:12 PM   #26
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Working space is set to sRGB ! But it leaves the embedded color profile as it is, uncalibrated in my case...I shoud've set it to convert every photo to the Working Space... I thought my photos were sRGB directly from my camera, didn't imagine I would need to make modifications to the color profile as well !
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Old Dec 18, 2010, 10:13 AM   #27
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You don't need to imbed a profile. As I said most printing processes default to sRGB - so since your Photoshop displays in sRGB what you see will match what shows up in the print - EXCEPT, and this is a big pet peeve of mine - some printing processes automatically apply color correction - I tend to only get prints made from places that do NOT do this. I just mention it because that can be another cause of prints not looking like they did on your monitor. Now, labs for professional photographers will offer color correction done by a human being which is nice. But a machine applied color correction can really damage some photos.
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Old Dec 18, 2010, 11:49 AM   #28
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some printing processes automatically apply color correction - I tend to only get prints made from places that do NOT do this
I had no idea, but that explains a lot. Thanks for the info!
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Old Dec 22, 2010, 4:38 AM   #29
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Hey guys, look at what I found in my PS CS5 Training manual:

Since increasing image resolution—from, say, 72 ppi to 300 ppi—makes the pixels smaller and packs them together more tightly, it results in a physically smaller but smoother and better-looking printed image. Lowering image resolution, on the other hand, means enlarging and loosening the pixels, which results in a physically larger image that, as you might suspect, looks like it was made from Legos because the pixels are so big you can see each one individually.
A printer is one of the few devices capable of modifying its output (that is, the print) based on an image’s resolution. In other words, send your inkjet printer a low-res version and a high-res version of the same picture and it’ll spit out images that differ vastly in size and quality.
The bottom line: Printers can take advantage of higher resolutions.

Note:
When you send files off to a professional printshop, it’s always a good idea to ask how much resolution they want for your images.



Then there's a big resolution-guidelines-for-print table, wich specifies that for color images, resolution should be between 240-480 ppi !


So why did you guys kept telling me: ''oh, forget about it, resolution isn't really that important''...

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Old Dec 22, 2010, 7:36 AM   #30
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Do what you like. Eventually, you will come to your own conclusion of what is true.
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